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Official Review [Album]: "A KIND OF HUSH" (SP-4581)

HOW WOULD YOU RATE THIS ALBUM?

  • ***** (BEST)

    Votes: 5 6.9%
  • ****

    Votes: 17 23.6%
  • ***

    Votes: 41 56.9%
  • **

    Votes: 8 11.1%
  • *

    Votes: 1 1.4%

  • Total voters
    72

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
Chris- Do you think One More Time and Ordinary Fool were both considered at the same time but one was chosen over the other? Sort of like You're the One and I Just Fall in Love Again for Passage.
 

crescentnoon

Active Member
I know it's not from this album but Crystal Lullaby gives me a similar feeling as One More Time. I especially love the part that goes:
Sometimes when I listen to
The velvet song that fills the summer afternoon
Something deep within me sighs
And wishes for the peaceful skies
Of long ago
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
Chris- Do you think One More Time and Ordinary Fool were both considered at the same time but one was chosen over the other? Sort of like You're the One and I Just Fall in Love Again for Passage.
With Ordinary Fool, according to the “Essential Collection” liner notes, it was one of ‘several extra songs tracked’ for the AKOH album. And as far as I can think, it’s the only one to be finished and released.
 

Chris May

Resident 'Carpenterologist'
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Chris- Do you think One More Time and Ordinary Fool were both considered at the same time but one was chosen over the other? Sort of like You're the One and I Just Fall in Love Again for Passage.
I don't know the full story yet behind it, other than the track [only] for Ordinary Fool was cut in January of '76, and both the track as well as the orchestration for One More Time was recorded and finished in February. Given the limited time span between the two - particularly the decision to fully orchestrate the latter tells me they probably made the decision early on to keep OF in the can.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Moderator
Isn't there also a tendency to favor the latest thing you've worked on?
 

Chris May

Resident 'Carpenterologist'
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Isn't there also a tendency to favor the latest thing you've worked on?
It’s quite possible, although they recorded several other tracks over the ensuing months. My guess is they just weren’t taken enough with it to finish it. So glad we have it all these years later though ☺
 

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
It’s quite possible, although they recorded several other tracks over the ensuing months. My guess is they just weren’t taken enough with it to finish it. So glad we have it all these years later though ☺
Have we heard of these before? Have any of them seen release? Tell us more, please.
 

Chris May

Resident 'Carpenterologist'
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Have we heard of these before? Have any of them seen release? Tell us more, please.
I just meant several of the other tunes that made it on the album. There was a title called Stay Young that was tracked the same day as One More Time, but never completed. Prior to that there were two unreleased tracks cut - never orchestrated in December of '75. Most everything else that was cut was completed and included on the "Hush" album. :)
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
Thinking of the drums for Goofus and Sandy on the Hush album: Cubby O'brien.
From Cubby (Oct 1996):
"O'Brien says he saw Karen just four days before her death. "They had gotten some action on a new record, and we were going out on tour for the first time in two years..." Had Karen lived, O'Brien says, the Carpenters' "place would be exactly what it was before: The reviewers would hate them, and everybody else would listen to them and buy their albums! Their music was some of the best music of the '70s."
Source:
Not so Mickey Mouse

December 1983, interview Cubby O'brien:
“When I joined the Carpenters, I had three days to learn the show with no music—only a tape. I walked around A&M Records with the tape to my ear, rehearsing and learning all the drum fills because Richard wanted to reproduce everything that either Karen or Hal Blaine had done,” he laughs, imitating a Hal Blaine fill in the air. “I was going crazy trying to learn all these fills, and what song they went in, and where. At that time Karen was playing too, and we were playing exactly the same fills on the same drums. We did that for a year or two with Karen still playing. "
Source:
Cubby O'Brien - Modern Drummer Magazine
 
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GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
UK Record Mirror, June 19, 1976:
THE CARPENTERS: 'A Kind of Hush' (A&M, AMLK 64581).
"Apparently, this eighth Carpenters' album expresses the duo's change of attitude, according to
Richard - although he doesn't go on to explain exactly what that change is. Listening to the album
I couldn't find anything startlingly different --Karen's voice is as pure as ever, and all the usual
vocal arrangements, care of Richard, are as strong as ever. In short, the album is as predictable as
ever, albeit enjoyably predictable. Side two contains to my ears the three best songs; 'I Need To Be In Love',
'One More Time' and Jackie De Shannon's lovely 'Boat To Sail.' There's also their last hit single
and what I think is their next single, Neil Sedaká s Breaking Up Is Hard To Do."

UK Record Mirror, June 26, 1976:
CARPENTERS: I Need To Be In Love (A&M, AMS 7238).
"Perfect. Thrills down the spine for the young men listening to the velvety voice (all in love with Karen);
and agreement from all the young ladles. Her presentation is superb, as always. The Carpenters always
choose songs wide enough to appeal to everyone, but always make sure the quality doesn't suffer in doing so.
Can't fail."
 
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ullalume

Well-Known Member
UK Record Mirror, June 19, 1976:
THE CARPENTERS: 'A Kind of Hush' (A&M, AMLK 64581).
"Apparently, this eighth Carpenters' album expresses the duo's change of attitude, according to
Richard - although he doesn't go on to explain exactly what that change is. Listening to the album
I couldn't find anything startlingly different --Karen's voice is as pure as ever, and all the usual
vocal arrangements, care of Richard, are as strong as ever. In short, the album is as predictable as
ever, albeit enjoyably predictable. Side two contains to my ears the three best songs; 'I Need To Be In Love',
'One More Time' and Jackie De Shannon's lovely 'Boat To Sail.' There's also their last hit single
and what I think is their next single, Neil Sedaká s Breaking Up Is Hard To Do."

UK Record Mirror, June 26, 1976:
CARPENTERS: I Need To Be In Love (A&M, AMS 7238).
"Perfect. Thrills down the spine for the young men listening to the velvety voice (all in love with Karen);
and agreement from all the young ladles. Her presentation is superb, as always. The Carpenters always
choose songs wide enough to appeal to everyone, but always make sure the quality doesn't suffer in doing so.
Can't fail."
And it didnt in the uk. Got to No 3.
 
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