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⭐ Official Review [Album]: "OFFERING"/"TICKET TO RIDE" (SP-4205)

How Would You Rate This Album?

  • ***** (Best)

    Votes: 13 21.3%
  • ****

    Votes: 19 31.1%
  • ***

    Votes: 19 31.1%
  • **

    Votes: 9 14.8%
  • *

    Votes: 1 1.6%

  • Total voters
    61

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
I have 2 versions of Ticket To Ride on CD... The first is the (CDMID 137) that says aad AM+ on the disc and the second is Rebound Records version (314 520 238-2) which has "The Carpenters" on the CD. Both say 1986 on the cover... But what is the difference? Are they basically identical CDs (sound quality wise) from the same source?

I’m going to assume that they are the same 1980’s version. The ‘aad’ just stands for “analog recorded-analog mixed-digitally mastered’ and can be found on numerous CD’s (or Sony would usually put under the CD logo “Digitally Mastered Analog Recording”) from the 80’s when companies were trying to tell people what was an all-digital recording (which would be represented as DDD or “Digitally Recorded-Digitally Mixed-Digitally Mastered”), as some customers wanted all-digital. But you might also see ‘add’ or (very rarely” ‘dad’. The last letter would always by D when going to CD, whereas for vinyls it would be A as it would be an analog master.

The A&M+ was A&M branding from the 70’s to tell people that they were getting higher quality sound on their vinyl because the vinyl was pressed on virgin vinyl rather than recycled vinyl. A&M continued it on CD’s in the 80’s because CD’s offered higher quality audio.

The Rebound, according to Discogs, was a Polygram Special Markets label active from 1994-1999 in the US. So it was probably a US Reissue using the 80’s master.
 
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Billy Rees

Well-Known Member
I’m going to assume that they are the same 1980’s version. The ‘aad’ just stands for “analog recorded-analog mixed-digitally mastered’ and can be found on numerous CD’s (or Sony would usually put under the CD logo “Digitally Mastered Analog Recording”) from the 80’s when companies were trying to tell people what was an all-digital recording (which would be represented as DDD or “Digitally Recorded-Digitally Mixed-Digitally Mastered”), as some customers wanted all-digital. But you might also see ‘add’ or (very rarely” ‘dad’. The last letter would always by D when going to CD, whereas for vinyls it would be A as it would be an analog master.

The A&M+ was A&M branding from the 70’s to tell people that they were getting higher quality sound on their vinyl because the vinyl was pressed on virgin vinyl rather than recycled vinyl. A&M continued it on CD’s in the 80’s because CD’s offered higher quality audio.

The Rebound sounds like it might be a Japanese release.

Thanks... The rebound one says "Made in New York" and has the AM+ aad on the back cover, but not on the CD itself... There's something about it being a Polygram company on it too... The only difference is its printed as "The" Carpenters on the CD.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
There should be no difference in the sound quality of those two. "Rebound" was a PolyGram budget moniker that they used for priced-down reissues. There's a Sergio Mendes FOOL ON THE HILL that appeared on the Rebound label too. Sounded the same as the regular A&M.
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
The “The Carpenters” sounds like they might’ve used a Japanese pressing as I recall there being a Japanese CD of Ticket with the “The” tacked on on the cover. But with Rebound only being active from 1994-1999, I would highly doubt that it was the Remaster version. But as I recall, A&M only started putting the copyright on Ticket in 86 because of a change in US copyright laws, otherwise the LP’s never carried it from 69-85.
 

John Adam

"Two Lives"
I've been listening to this album, initially I wasn't overly impressed. Now I'm a fan!
This song has a very 1960's feel and lyric and a very sunshine pop vibe. Just what I needed to start off my day today! Plus Karen behind the drum kit, looking so at home and having so much fun. Even if it was just miming......... :)

 

Jarred

Well-Known Member
I’ve been hearing the 1987 remix of “Eve” lately and it’s just astonishing how full-bodied and developed her voice was at 19, and to think it could get even better. Such innate sophistication of tone and intonation that singers twice her age never have, yet they’re just as popular as she would be. Someday and All of My Life are just as mesmerizing, but Eve stuck out (like the rose among the thorns) because of the ambiguity of the words and Karen gets across the narrator’s (Karen as Eve, Richard as Adam, platonically) pain of seemingly not having a “self”, trapped as an unreal “image”, but allowing herself a bit of hope/having hope for Eve, that she will find wholeness and happiness before that damn bitter winter comes.

Karen’s trademark is alternately one of a preternatural detachment from a would-be optimistic lyric (aided by Richard’s arrangement reflecting her tone), knowing and suggesting a darker reality thus creating a chilling contrast; being handed a mournful lyric and cutting through any sentiment to reveal a state of acceptance that she understands the futility of the words, as though she knows the human condition is often a black hole of discovery; or playing with a lyric that isn’t defined strictly by optimism or pessimism where she can imply an assortment of moods while still deferring a sense of who the narrator really is as a whole person, yet it never feels incomplete. Underpinning all of this is of course a singular tone of mystery, warmth, melancholy, passion, intelligence, that encompassed any lyric that passed through her lips. Her musicality was something no one else could possess, take away from her, or destroy. You just wish that she understood the modicum of power she held over others.
 
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Kacfan

Well-Known Member
I’ve been hearing the 1987 remix of “Eve” lately and it’s just astonishing how full-bodied and developed her voice was at 19, and to think it could get even better. Such innate sophistication of tone and intonation that singers twice her age never have, yet they’re just as popular as she would be. Someday and All of My Life are just as mesmerizing, but Eve stuck out (like the rose among the thorns) because of the ambiguity of the words and Karen gets across the narrator’s (Karen as Eve, Richard as Adam, platonically) pain of seemingly not having a “self”, trapped as an unreal “image”, but allowing herself a bit of hope/having hope for Eve, that she will find wholeness and happiness before that damn bitter winter comes.

Karen’s trademark is alternately one of a preternatural detachment from a would-be optimistic lyric (aided by Richard’s arrangement reflecting her tone), knowing and suggesting a darker reality thus creating a chilling contrast; being handed a mournful lyric and cutting through any sentiment to reveal a state of acceptance that she understands the futility of the words, as though she knows the human condition is often a black hole of discovery; or playing with a lyric that isn’t defined strictly by optimism or pessimism where she can imply an assortment of moods while still deferring a sense of who the narrator really is as a whole person, yet it never feels incomplete. Underpinning all of this is of course a singular tone of mystery, warmth, melancholy, passion, intelligence, that encompassed any lyric that passed through her lips. Her musicality was something no one else could possess, take away from her, or destroy. You just wish that she understood the modicum of power she held over others.
That was one of the most perfect descriptions of her talent that I have read.
 

Jarred

Well-Known Member
That was one of the most perfect descriptions of her talent that I have read.

Thank you so much, I really appreciate that. I love writing, deconstructing, etc and when it comes to a topic like Carpenter’s and Karen, a subject that feels very personal and fascinating to me, I could extol their gifts through the written word for pages on end.
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
"Carpenters Get 'Ticket To Ride' the Charts
December 13, 1969, Record World (page 50):
NEW YORK-
The Carpenters, brother and sister Richard and Karen, seem to be breaking out all over. Their single, Lennon & McCartney's "Ticket to Ride,"
is getting play on many top 40 stations and has already been enjoying success on easy listening outlets. The hit was arranged by Richard,
as is all the material in their new A&M album, "Offering." He also composed all but three songs on the album. Karen and Richard are from Downey, Calif. They have been involved in a jazz trio, then a rock group (which is basically the same group which backs them up when they perform live) and finally on their own. On the album, and in person Karen plays drums; she also played bass on several cuts on "Offering."
Richard handles keyboard chores. Richard and Karen, The Carpenters, have appeared or will soon be appearing at KHJ's "Boss City," on the Della Reese TV show and at premiere receptions for "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" and "Hello, Dolly"! in Los Angeles.
They are in New York to do the "All American College Show." Richard describes their music as a "rock -folk -jazz -pop - soft -this that and the other thing." Karen is a bit more brief in her description; she says that the music is "basically soft." Whatever you call it, it seems to be gaining favor with a lot of people. Karen and Richard have already started recording for their second album."
 

Song4uman

Well-Known Member
Ok.
There’s Offering

there’s Ticket To Ride

there’s the weird Pink album

there’s the budget Hamlet album which I do want to get.

then I remember someone mentioning a “Ticket” album that had the word “The” before Carpenters.
anyone have info on that??
Jonathan
 

GDB2LV

Well-Known Member
The Japanese version of TTR says The Carpenters, cd and vinyl. The British version with Close To You and WOJB vinyl also says The Carpenters.
 

TimeWarp

Member
Offering/Ticket To Ride is in my top three Carpenters studio albums. I love "Turn Away", "Don't Be Afraid", and "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing". Of course, the fact Karen played the drums for the album (and bass for two songs) is a bonus. The only song I don't care for is "Get Together". I actually think it might be their worst cover of a song. 🤫
 

A&M Retro

Well-Known Member
I believe it sold 18,000 copies when first released. I think Richard stated that once, if memory serves. Obviously, it did much better when re-released under the new title and cover.
 

David A

Well-Known Member
Offering/Ticket To Ride is in my top three Carpenters studio albums. I love "Turn Away", "Don't Be Afraid", and "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing". Of course, the fact Karen played the drums for the album (and bass for two songs) is a bonus. The only song I don't care for is "Get Together". I actually think it might be their worst cover of a song. 🤫

Having not listened to this in years, I gave Get Together a listen, and I think I agree with you - maybe their least successful cover song.

Overall, though, the 60's vibe that suffuses this album is a treat and a real window into what eventually evolved into the Carpenters as the world came to know them.
 

JohnFB

Well-Known Member
As I said somewhere before I think DON'T BE AFRAID is a really good song (for that time) and should perhaps have been the first single issued from that album - any song with the lyrics "...love is a groovy thing, it knows how to make you sing..." is alright in my book. Maybe ALL OF MY LIFE would have been a good second single...ALL I CAN DO could have backed either one...TICKET TO RIDE could have waited until third...
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
My only caveat there is that both of those songs were Richard Carpenter-composed. The fact that "Ticket To Ride" was a Beatles song probably caught the attention of music programmers, curious as to what some unknown group did with a known tune. Those others more likely would have been passed over, perhaps unlistened to. 1969 wasn't a great year for A&M product.
 

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
As I said somewhere before I think DON'T BE AFRAID is a really good song (for that time) and should perhaps have been the first single issued from that album - any song with the lyrics "...love is a groovy thing, it knows how to make you sing..." is alright in my book. Maybe ALL OF MY LIFE would have been a good second single...ALL I CAN DO could have backed either one...TICKET TO RIDE could have waited until third...
You picked three really good cuts from this album, JohnFB!
 

David A

Well-Known Member
‘Offering’ just gets better with age. It’s so different from their other stuff. It’s like a time capsule of two uber-talented, exuberant, enthusiastic, raring to go suburban kids let loose in a real studio to do their thing. And that’s precisely what we hear.
Absolutely! Perfectly said.
 

JohnFB

Well-Known Member
My only caveat there is that both of those songs were Richard Carpenter-composed. The fact that "Ticket To Ride" was a Beatles song probably caught the attention of music programmers, curious as to what some unknown group did with a known tune. Those others more likely would have been passed over, perhaps unlistened to. 1969 wasn't a great year for A&M product.
There's no doubt that TICKET is a heavier, more complex and far more creative arrangement - and even Karen's initial vocal on this was really superb for her age - I'd like to think that this is one of the songs John Lennon heard that prompted him to remark on her lovely, or beautiful voice when they passed that day in the restaurant - but the fact that it only reached, what, 55 on the pop chart might have had something to do with the song's complex arrangement that varied so much from the original that was still fairly fresh in memory - this was super ambitious and bold, going for a first hit by covering of all things a recent big Beatles hit - it was a great effort, but it might have been just a little too soon - I think it would have been worth it to take a chance on a song like AFRAID to make their first approach to the public - it was an upbeat, feel good song that was not complex at all but was "in the groove of the times" and it had a good chance of catching on and getting them some attention and name recognition before they attempted something more serious like TICKET...(TICKET is one of my favorite tracks on the RPO album).

Here's AFRAID - what's not to love - it's 1969 and it's got "hit" written all over it...

 
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TimeWarp

Member
Having not listened to this in years, I gave Get Together a listen, and I think I agree with you - maybe their least successful cover song.

Overall, though, the 60's vibe that suffuses this album is a treat and a real window into what eventually evolved into the Carpenters as the world came to know them.
I agree about the 60s vibe - it is, indeed, one of the qualities I enjoy about this album. I also like the experimental feel of the album.
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
Ok.
There’s Offering

there’s Ticket To Ride

there’s the weird Pink album

there’s the budget Hamlet album which I do want to get.

then I remember someone mentioning a “Ticket” album that had the word “The” before Carpenters.
anyone have info on that??
Jonathan
There’s also the red label remastered CD version.
 
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