• The new Carpenters recording with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is now available. Use this link to order, and help us out at the same time. Thank you!

Anyone read this?

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member

newvillefan

I Know My First Name Is Stephen
#60 July 1978: "Appearance on Tonight Show June 27th. The Christmas Album is Completed. At the present time, back in Studio working
on their next Album. They met group Abba while in Germany for Star Parade. Christmas TV Special this year.
And here is that very occasion where Richard and Karen shared a stage with ABBA! (Courtesy of facebook page "The Carpenters: History & News"):

 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
Excerpts:
A Talk with Paul Williams, Part 1
Paul Zollo
-
July 21, 2020
-

The Carpenters, “Rainy Days and Mondays,”
By Paul Williams and Roger Nichols

"I think the interesting thing about the song is that it sold more than three million copies of the sheet music. Which means people were buying it and learning it. To me that was a sign of something going back into the family structure; learning the song and playing it at home.
‘Rainy Days And Mondays’ took months to write. I knew that ‘rainy days and Mondays get me down’ but,
I didn’t know why or what I was going to do with it. "
----
"The Carpenters were good for me. The songs that they did were not written with them in mind. "
---
More:
A Talk with Paul Williams, Part 1 « American Songwriter
 
I would like to give a Thumbs Up to the Rick Henry book: Carpenters --- Album by Album: Song by Song. I purchased it at Amazon, just received it, and have only skimmed through it so far. The book is comprised of information on each song from Carpenters' albums, including the solo ventures. Albums are listed chronologically, and each album is discussed with the same format: information, among other things, on release date, musicians, producers, chart positions, and other anecdotes, followed by trivia and origins of each song, as well as Mr. Henry's editorial comments on songs and albums and his ratings of each album.

I have been a long-time fan who thought I knew "everything" about the Carpenters and their songs. Yet I have learned so many things during several years viewing (and sometimes posting) comments at this terrific A&M Corner website, and I can see that Mr. Henry is a font of further information in his interesting paperback. I tend to agree with Mr. Henry's editorial musings (for instance, with his album ratings in comparison with each other). My only gripe is that, as well organized as this book indeed is, a table of contents and page numbers would provide further organization and clarity.

All in all, Mr. Henry's book is filled with interesting and fun facts. Some here may quibble with the occasional minor error, but overall I would consider this a great and invaluable resource on the recordings of our beloved Karen and Richard. :)
I haven't read the whole book through yet. All I've been doing with this book is that, when I need to know more about a particular song, I look for and read the information about it in there when I feel I'm left with no other proper source of information about something. When making a YouTube video intended for Japanese viewers where I was to explain in Japanese the grammar, words, and pronunciation of the lyrics of, and behind-the-scenes information about, B'wana She No Home, I found myself left with no one who might know what exactly "b'wana" might mean. I goggled it and left my questions in the comment section of several B'wana videos, only to find that no answer had come out. Half giving up, I consulted the Rick Henry book and found the answer. At that time I was not quite familiar with the A&M Corner, by the way.
 
Last edited:

A&M Retro

Well-Known Member
Too Cool! Where did you find that picture, Rick?

Yes, that interview used to be posted on You Tube in two incarnations, but it was removed, unfortunately.

The first version is the interview spotlight that aired in August of 1981. It’s a few minutes long. The other version uses different footage from the same interview when Casey did a tribute to Karen in February of ‘83. Karen looks drawn, but it’s a fun interview.
 
Last edited:

Rick-An Ordinary Fool

Well-Known Member
Too Cool! Where did you find that picture, Rick?

Yes, that interview used to be posted on You Tube in two incarnations, but it was removed, unfortunately.

The first version is the interview spotlight that aired in August of 1981. It’s a few minutes long. The other version uses different footage from the same interview when Casey did a tribute to Karen in February of ‘83. Karen looks drawn, but it’s a fun interview.
It’s too bad I missed that interview. It would have been nice to see that. I hope it shows up again someday. Thanks for the write up on it.
 

Portlander

Well-Known Member
It is always nice to see the Carpenters receiving any recognition particularly during the period where they had most of their success. Though I have respect for Joni Mitchell, her first hit (#25) was in early 1973 so we definitely were not listening to her 50 years ago. Paul McCartney/Wings did not have a Top 40 hit until March of 1971 with "Another Day" and James Taylor charted once in September of 1970 with "Fire and Rain". Elton John did not reach the Top 40 until January of 1971 with "Your Song". So technically we were not listening to any of these artists 50 years ago today!

I personally think the writer for this article could have chosen stronger candidates for the cover photos with minimum effort and research. The Beatles, Stevie Wonder, Chicago, Diana Ross, Bread, Three Dog Night, and Neil Diamond would all have been better candidates. They all had far greater chart success and radio play during 1970 than the above mentioned artists (some actually had none) which is what this article is supposed to be about. Now if the story was about the music of the entire decade it would be a little more credible but Joni still wouldn't make the cut.
 

GDB2LV

Well-Known Member
The article was actually about the beginnings of some acts or artists, and the breakup of big acts in the year 1970. Perhaps the headline should have been retitled as such, but doesn’t sound as good. The small blurb about Carpenters inside with Richard & Karen holding the sunflower spinner was just that. Still, glad they made the cover. Maybe some parents or grandparents had a chance to explain who they were in pop music culture. Maybe some new fans if they went online to listen. Just great to see anything here in the USA for once.
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
It is always nice to see the Carpenters receiving any recognition particularly during the period where they had most of their success. Though I have respect for Joni Mitchell, her first hit (#25) was in early 1973 so we definitely were not listening to her 50 years ago. Paul McCartney/Wings did not have a Top 40 hit until March of 1971 with "Another Day" and James Taylor charted once in September of 1970 with "Fire and Rain". Elton John did not reach the Top 40 until January of 1971 with "Your Song". So technically we were not listening to any of these artists 50 years ago today!

I personally think the writer for this article could have chosen stronger candidates for the cover photos with minimum effort and research. The Beatles, Stevie Wonder, Chicago, Diana Ross, Bread, Three Dog Night, and Neil Diamond would all have been better candidates. They all had far greater chart success and radio play during 1970 than the above mentioned artists (some actually had none) which is what this article is supposed to be about. Now if the story was about the music of the entire decade it would be a little more credible but Joni still wouldn't make the cut.
Or the Hardy Boys would qualify for 1970!😄
 
Top Bottom