Brasil '66 singles

Suppress your fandom of Brasil '66 for a moment and try to look at this as someone in their late teens or early 20s […]:



That's death, right there. I personally love Andy Williams and Sergio (and I had a massive crush on Lani)---but even if the group could have somehow made themselves as 1970-hip-now as the "Stillness" album cover suggested, nobody was gonna buy it coming from them.

I wonder if Michael's perspective and insights on this matter would have only been possible after-the-fact (with the benefit of hind-sight / in-retrospect).
I suppose Sergio, or his manager, or A&M marketing (or whoever it was who made these decisions for how to promote the band and its music) were trying (I assume that their strategy was) to appeal to a broad array of demographics. The TV appearances seem to reflect such an approach.

For one thing, Sergio had a connection with Andy Williams (That's where he got Janis Hansen from) (correct?).

The Music Scene show on ABC had a lot of the younger, hipper Soul and Rock acts -- and the footage that I see seems to be mostly live -- whereas, B'66's appearance was largely mimed (albeit with live acoustic piano on "Lineman").
I suppose B'66 looked out-of-place in that context (by 1969).

But, there is footage on INA (French) TV that is live doing a fast-tempo rendition of Edu Lobo's "Upa Neguino" -- no orchestration. To my ears (in the 21st century) it seems like hip, cutting-edge Brasilian M.P.B. and not any old lounge Jazz Bossa Nova (the way the American mainstream maybe have perceived that).
 

Michael Hagerty

Well-Known Member
I wonder how many of those young, hip, Rock and Soul fans of the late 1960s (who had these cultural hang-ups/sensibilities that Michael speaks of) were watching the Andy Williams show. (That clip is from 1968, or maybe 1969, right?)

I wonder if they cared about what, and who was on that show.

I suppose, if I am not mistaken, the typical middle-class American household back then (51 years ago) had only one television set, so -- the senario might be something like -- the teenager would be walking past the living room with that show on, and maybe Mom and or Dad were watching it?
The clip is from '68. Of the mainstream variety shows, Andy's was the hippest. That's largely due to his choice of musical director---Mike Post (who we'd later know from the themes for The Rockford Files, Hill Street Blues, Magnum, P.I. and others). Mike booked acts like Sergio, but he also booked Simon and Garfunkel, Linda Ronstadt and other young artists of the time---and part of the show was a duet. Here's the one with Linda:



And here's the one with Simon and Garfunkel:



You're right that it was one TV set and only three channels---seven or nine in the very biggest cities with multiple independent stations---but even if it wasn't all rock and roll, Andy treated the newer artists with respect, which is not something you could say of every variety host at the time.
 

Michael Hagerty

Well-Known Member
I wonder if Michael's perspective and insights on this matter would have only been possible after-the-fact (with the benefit of hind-sight / in-retrospect).



Nope. I was in the thick of it---aged 12 to 15 during the run of Andy's shows. That's what my contemporaries thought then. I had more tolerance for MOR acts than most.


I suppose Sergio, or his manager, or A&M marketing (or whoever it was who made these decisions for how to promote the band and its music) were trying (I assume that their strategy was) to appeal to a broad array of demographics. The TV appearances seem to reflect such an approach.
Mike Post booked the acts, but there were a lot of connections. For starters, Andy's wife Claudine Longet, recorded for A&M as well.
 
Some serious out of context editing there, Intuitive.

The quote was about MOR radio stations,---and it read:

I wasn't trying take anything mis-leadingly (disingenuously) out-of-context. I missed it and now I think I get what you were saying --

I honestly was under the impression that you were referring (more-broadly) to all (American) record-buyers of that demographic (at the time -- mid- and late- 1960s) -- not just the Herb Albert fans who were within that age range.

(I've been busy and this thread is long and has a lot of content, so I might miss a few things. Thank you for clarifying that.)
 

lj

Active Member
The Andy Williams Show had a string of great arrangers starting with Bob Mersey from the early 60's, who arranged Andy's biggest hit from that decade--Can't Get Used to Losing You--and later Dave Grusin and Nick De Carlo, who we know from their association with A&M records. We must not forget the Ed Sullivan Show from the 60's which also had an amazing variety of musical stars from opera to pop crooners to the top rock and roll acts. And all the singing and orchestrations were done live--nothing was pre-recorded. The 60's were the heyday for good TV variety show music. I also fondly recall the Kraft Music Hall, the Perry Como Show and the Hollywood Palace.
 
In my pre-teen days, I never bought singles that I heard on the radio. In 1969,when I was 14, I went out to stores and bought some discounted singles at a department store as they were three for one dollar and Fool On The Hill was one of them along with The Look Of Love. I also bought the Look Around album and that was the first album that I had ever bought. I bought only one or two singles at regular price after that and saved and spent more on albums and I now only buy CD's of artists that I like and none by artists that have come on the scene after 1985.
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Staff member
Site Admin
In my pre-teen days, I never bought singles that I heard on the radio.
In my pre-teen days, I didn't even listen to the radio. I listened to a lot of records that my parents owned, and also had some of the earlier LPs in my own early collection (which sadly weren't too well cared for, or played on the best of equipment). I've always been an LP listener at heart and didn't find much use for 45s back then. Up to a certain point, I only had my own "kid" 45s, and a handful of others including some A&Ms. When my cousin took us on a tour of the studio he was an engineer at, I suddenly had over 100 new 45s--he gave us a couple of empty 45 shipping cartons and had us pick among all the promos they had on hand.

I started listening to the radio probably around 1977 or so, to the local funk and dance stations. So at that point, I was buying up 12-inch singles regularly. And not too long after, having my own tuner in my system, I would keep WJZZ on for hours, and they played fusion and contemporary jazz along with a few classics. Those would always be album-based purchases, as most jazz records didn't have 45 RPM singles.

On top of that, our local record store chain had a yearly "Gran Prix" sale and would feature everything in the store at like 20-25% off, so I would often buy as many as a dozen albums during those couple of weeks.

At that point, and even today, the only time I would buy a single is if it had a non-album track I couldn't get anywhere else. I wasn't (and still am not) into the single-mix versions of the records--I think that since I grew up being so album-centric, I never grew attached to singles. They are still a very small part of my main collection. Maybe 80-90 at the very most, with no desire to buy any unless it's an upgrade to one I already own. I still have all those old 45s stored in the basement but haven't played them in decades. They're in no great condition.
 
To put it in perspective, here's a video that pretty much crystallizes the problem. Suppress your fandom of Brasil '66 for a moment and try to look at this as someone in their late teens or early 20s who reveres the Beatles and the "authenticity" of the late 60s rock era, as it begins to transition into the singer-songwriter movement:



That's death, right there. I personally love Andy Williams and Sergio (and I had a massive crush on Lani)---but even if the group could have somehow made themselves as 1970-hip-now as the "Stillness" album cover suggested, nobody was gonna buy it coming from them.


(Don't ask me how, where, and why I found that particular image/photo, there. : ) I (honestly) have no idea who she is. )

It seems that she is into the "heavy" groups of the late 1960s -- Cream, Hendrix, and I see a psychedelic image of John Lennon. That photo might very well be from 1968, or maybe 1969.
 

Michael Hagerty

Well-Known Member


(Don't ask me how, where, and why I found that particular image/photo, there. : ) I (honestly) have no idea who she is. )

It seems that she is into the "heavy" groups of the late 1960s -- Cream, Hendrix, and I see a psychedelic image of John Lennon. That photo might very well be from 1968, or maybe 1969.
Probably '68. Could be '67, which is the year Richard Avedon did the Lennon poster. But cream didn't really break here in the U.S. until 1968.
 
In my pre-teen days, I never bought singles that I heard on the radio. In 1969,when I was 14, I went out to stores and bought some discounted singles at a department store as they were three for one dollar and Fool On The Hill was one of them along with The Look Of Love. I also bought the Look Around album and that was the first album that I had ever bought. I bought only one or two singles at regular price after that and saved and spent more on albums and I now only buy CD's of artists that I like and none by artists that have come on the scene after 1985.
I made an error. I have not bought anything by an artist that has come on the scene after 1988. There are very few artists that have come on after that year that I really like and maybe I will get a "Greatest Hits" but that would be all.
 
Top Bottom