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Carpenters near acapella songs

And remember, too, I believe this was just a work lead? So it could be that, for her, she was just "phoning it in." But even when Karen just "phoned it in," it was pretty spectacular.
This is also something to take into account. She also seems to even miss a bit of one line "...love might forget me, and that love might let me down". I always found that an awkward pause, that the choir fills.
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
Yes, the song, Now, is a "work lead."
So, I give it some leeway.
But,
the 1975 song Trying To Get The Feelin' Again is a work lead.
then, later (1980/1981) we have a work lead in the song Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore....
Problem is , no matter how you dice it, the "lead vocals" for the song "Now"
are so airy, weak, thin and high that it masks any sense of my establishing a fourth wall--
that is, I can not divorce myself from "hearing" Karen's unhealthiness throughout the song.
Now, I realize there are detractors from my opinion,
but, no way are the vocals on the song "Now" indicative of a healthy human being.
 
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ThaFunkyFakeTation

Ah am so steel een luv weeth yoo
Yes, the song, Now, is a "work lead."
So, I give it some leeway.
But,
the 1975 song Trying To Get The Feelin' Again is a work lead.
then, later (1980/1981) we have a work lead in the song Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore....
Problem is , no matter how you dice it, the "lead vocals" for the song "Now"
are so airy, weak, thin and high that it masks any sense of my establishing a fourth wall--
that is, I can not divorce myself from "hearing" Karen's unhealthiness throughout the song.
Now, I realize there are detractors from my opinion,
but, no way are the vocals on the song "Now" indicative of a healthy human being.
Couldn't agree more. It's really the only one I can think of where she sounds ill. She just sounds like she doesn't have much energy. When she comes back in with "And Now, Now...", it's supposed to be climactic but Karen comes in like a lamb.

It's interesting that even at that, she still sounds better than most singers. Her pitch is dead on throughout and her phrasing is still all there.

Ed
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
^Yes, I want to make sure that folks understand I am NOT underestimating Karen's prowess as
preeminent songstress...I am reiterating that when weighed against her other work-leads,
the song Now sounds entirely different from all the others.
She was doing her best in bad health (notwithstanding a substandard song).
 

Geographer

Well-Known Member
Yes, the song, Now, is a "work lead."
So, I give it some leeway.
But,
the 1975 song Trying To Get The Feelin' Again is a work lead.
then, later (1980/1981) we have a work lead in the song Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore....
Problem is , no matter how you dice it, the "lead vocals" for the song "Now"
are so airy, weak, thin and high that it masks any sense of my establishing a fourth wall--
that is, I can not divorce myself from "hearing" Karen's unhealthiness throughout the song.
Now, I realize there are detractors from my opinion,
but, no way are the vocals on the song "Now" indicative of a healthy human being.
Since her lead vocal on the work lead of "Your Baby" is stronger...and done around the same time...could it actually be the song itself? Perhaps Richard's arrangement called for her lead to be "airy?" I, too, find the song to be pleasant enough, but not the strong contender that Richard often touts it to be. I think his arrangement...sans choir...is stronger than her "take" on the song and is probably what saves it.
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
Geographer raises a very good question.
I have always had my suspicions about the album Made In America: that is, were Karen's vocals
on that album intentionally softer and less-pronounced, or was her voice compromised through bad health.
I have come to the conclusion that on that particular album Karen was intentional in her nuanced delivery.
In fact, I have come to appreciate that album more as time goes on.

Now, returning to April 1982, and the song "Now." Its vocal delivery reminds me of that frightening
Top of the World live-performance, the late 1981 performance on TV in France: Karen is gasping for air.
Her lows are vacuous, too many high-keys and an inability to slide into the notes.
The sad part is that the song Now, in comparison to TOTW, is in a much slower tempo and yet
Karen is still exhibiting those issues in a recording studio (at least, to my ears).
The song "Now" is singular, in that it is the only song in their entire studio-recorded output where
I believe Karen's lead vocals sound seriously compromised due to ill-health.
 

John Adam

Well-Known Member
Here they are, focus on Karen's vocals on ''Now'' & ''You're Enough'':
First, thanks for giving us these to listen to @TheOneBeatleManiac !

In regards to "You're Enough."
Many singers would wish they could be on key and sing the way Karen in 1982. Far from her best, considering the circumstances though, it was a great work-lead, and we were fortunate that Richard was able to finish the production and share this with us! :)
 

newvillefan

I Know My First Name Is Stephen
Far from her best, considering the circumstances though, it was a great work-lead, and we were fortunate that Richard was able to finish the production and share this with us!
I’ve never posted much about this track and the focus is usually on Now amongst the diehard fans, but of the two 1982 tracks this is probably my favourite. The line “if they’ll only shine their lucky starlight down on me” just has something so magical and Disney-esque about it, enhanced - for once - by the echo of the OK Chorale when they sing “make it shine”. I wish it was anthologised more and that more people were aware of it.
 
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