Classic AOTW Claudine Longet LOVE IS BLUE SP-4142

What is your favorite track?

  • Falling in Love Again

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • Happy Talk

    Votes: 5 27.8%
  • Love is Blue

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Holiday

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Dindi

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • Who Needs You

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • When I Look In Your Eyes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Walk In The Park

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Small Talk

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • Snow

    Votes: 4 22.2%
  • It's Hard to Say Goodbye

    Votes: 4 22.2%

  • Total voters
    18

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
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Claudine Longet
LOVE IS BLUE

A&M SP-4142



Also released as mono LP-142, and on CD in Japan as POCM-1941

Tracks:

1. Falling in Love Again (Can't Help It) (Frederick Hollander) 3:09*
2. Happy Talk (Rogers/Hammerstein II) 3:08
3. Love is Blue (L'Amour Est Bleu) (Blackburn-Cour-Popp) 2:46
4. Holiday (Barry Gibb-Robin Gibb) 3:03
5. Dindi (Jin-Jee) (Jobim-Gilbert-Oliviera) 2:35
6. Who Needs You (Stillman-Allen) 3:10*
7. When I Look In Your Eyes (Leslie Bricusse) 2:21
8. Walk In The Park (W. Sievers) 2:30*
9. Small Talk (Bonner-Gordon) 2:20*
10. Snow (Randy Newman) 2:44
11. It's Hard to Say Goodbye (Nichols-Williams) 3:11

*Male voice-Tommy LiPuma
PRODUCER: TOMMY LIPUMA / ARRANGER: NICK DECARO / CHILDREN'S VOICES DIRECTED BY: JIMMY JOYCE / RECORDING ENGINEER: HENRY LEWY / MIXING ENGINEER: RAY GERHARDT / ALBUM DESIGN: BY CORPORATE HEAD / ART DIRECTOR: TOM WILKES / PHOTOGRAPHY: BY GUY WEBSTER

Slender tender clever, brightened young and fine,
To Vegas Claudine Longet came, arriving just in time
To dance, to act, to be--to shine.
Schooled in ballet, drama-trained, she worked until
Her car broke down. "Hello," said Andy Williams,
Passing by. "Pardon?" said Miss Longet. "Help have I,"
Said Andy, and in a little while, the car was fixed
And the two were wed and then, and by and by,
two children came
And Claudine Longet said "Bye Bye"--farewell to
footlights, arclights, fame.
Well, "au revoir" was what she meant, for in a year or so
She sang a song on Channel Four and Alpert said "Hello!
"There's magic here--and honesty;
"We'll sign her, seal her, albums make."
Thrice one LP's there are by now--this one is
Number Three;
A lovely thing--a joy to hold, to hear, to know, to see.
Slender, tender, clever--still brighteyed young and fine,
Claudine's here for ever now. She's Andy's, yours
-and mine. -Derek Taylor
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
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I voted for the sumptuous Nichols-Williams song that closes the album, "It's Hard To Say Goodbye." That recording also appeared on the A&M BankAmericard sampler, MUSIC BOX (though it suffers from the HAECO-CSG processing there).

"Snow", another favorite appeared on the A&M Christmas sampler SOMETHING FESTIVE. (Sometimes de weend blows thwoo de twees...)

"Small Talk" with Tommy LiPuma doing the male vocal part also had a different single version with hubby Andy Williams providing half of the duet. (It's available on the Varese Sarabande compilation THE VERY BEST OF CLAUDINE LONGET.)

Harry
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
Although this 3rd installment can be an almost myopic copy of the first two albums, producer Tommy LiPuma adds a few tricks to the repertoire such as contributing his own vocal to "Who Needs You?", "Falling In Love Again", the "strolling through the park one day in the merry, merry month of May"-beat of "Walk In The Park" and "Small Talk" (yes Andy Williams shares the duet w/ Claudine on the single version; --I've had that compilation, too)...

And the added boys choir in "Love Is Blue" (which I think I have had a vivid image of in my dreams, at least once after falling asleep to) and the one little boy's high-pitched solo in "Happy Talk" where the Jimmy Joyce Boys Choir is used again...

Randy Newman's "Snow" gives this album a somewhat satirical vein and I wish more and more that I voted for the Paul Williams/Roger Nichols-written "It's Hard To Say Goodbye"... I really forgot how that song both begins AND ends this album quite well...

Nice that Claudine ably sings out "Dindi (Jin-Jee)" in a sentimental and sensible manner, avoiding the unctuous treatment that Chris Montez (and even Frank Sinatra) gave it... While the Leslie Bricusse (and Anthony Newley?) composition, "When I Look In Your Eyes" also gets a very epic and dramatic reading...

The Bee-Gees "Holiday", although being a least favorite still has that sparkle and shine and as one of the first-covered tunes by the early-Brothers Gibb, seems to be an appropriate addition giving way for more of their songs to be done by more artists in the future...

In all, a great third effort to the Claudine Longet canon, and still avoiding any such tendencies to become any sort of formula, though mainly from compounding any "ordinary monotonies" with the extraordinary implements and nuances added, release, after, release...



Dave
 

Moritat

Member
Small Talk was my easy choice as favorite, although I do like Snow as well. Not a great lp, but enough good tunes to warrart a purchase.
 

JO

New Member
Dave said:
Although this 3rd installment can be an almost myopic copy of the first two albums...
Couldn't have disagreed with you more, Dave. Her unique vocal talent has matured a great deal since the debute; additionally, her producer (and A&R guy) is now starting to hit stride with aligning song and arrangement selection with her unique vocal talent. Colours, which is next, is most certainly her peak, and just about as good as it gets "for this sorta thing...".
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
JO said:
Dave said:
Although this 3rd installment can be an almost myopic copy of the first two albums...

Couldn't have disagreed with you more, Dave. Her unique vocal talent has matured a great deal since the debute...

Well, I meant it, that this album was prevented from being a carbon-copy of the first two, with the "improvements" that producer Tommy LiPuma gave his production behind Ms. Longet...

Yes, Claudine's vocal has matured a great deal, and so has the arcane esoteric appeal of hearing her... Much more greatly appreciated on this release... Though to me, yes, it's owed to the material and refinement and renewal in the production, through Nick DeCaro's still able arrangements...



A&Mguyfromwayback said:
So what does Tommy LiPuma's singing voice sound like?

Very much like arranger Nick DeCaro's voice, whom I thought La Longet was duetting with, at first (yes, you'll hear him sing a couple of songs on his upcoming Happy Heart LP) only a bit deeper... Maybe an almost Richard Carpenter of his time; to me I hear a sort of similarity (Ah, though not quite, entirely)...



Dave
 

Harry

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Thread Starter
Staff member
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Mike said:
Sorry, but I think she stinks!
She's an acquired taste, for sure. As a generality, it seems that women cannot stand her voice, while men seem more accepting. That of course isn't always true, as with any generality, but it often holds.

Harry
 

Mr Bill

Gentlemanly Curmudgeon
Staff member
Moderator
First time I heard her (on either Music Box or Something Festive) I couldn't stand her voice. But after finding her first three LPs in a coutout record shop (along with a dozen other early A&Ms, all still sealed) I started getting into her voice. Sure, I have to be in the mood, but I don't mind it now (though "Snow" makes me cringe and I always skip it).

Some of you old-timers here may remember my story about a parrty I had back in the 80s when I was stationed in Norfolk, VA. I invited everyone to a "Claudine Longet Listening Party" -- a BYOB affair with BBQ and all. WHen everyone showed up and heard Ms Longet cooing out of the speakers and all her A&M LPs spread out in front of the entertainment center it took only one side of the first LP before my guests thratened revolt and or to depart taking their booze with them, adding they didn't think I was serious let alone actually owned the LPs! :laugh:

--Mr Bill
thinking I prefer Claudine over Liza... but not really sure. I must ponder more...
 

Captaindave

Well-Known Member
Harry said:
Mike said:
Sorry, but I think she stinks!
She's an acquired taste, for sure. As a generality, it seems that women cannot stand her voice, while men seem more accepting. That of course isn't always true, as with any generality, but it often holds.

Harry
I first heard of her back in the later 1960s from a friend of mine at the time. I have never really found myself liking her voice much. I always saw her as more of a "novelty" than a serious singer. For me, a little of her goes a long way...even though I do like some of the songs she has recorded.

I will have to say that in the case of my friend, he was doing more looking at her than actually listening to her... :rolleyes:
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
I've only heard two Claudine songs: "Snow," and whatever one was on the MUSIC BOX album ("It's Hard to Say Goodbye," I think?) I've never acquired the taste but am tempted to check out the albums just to give them a chance. Maybe someday, I suppose.
 

JO

New Member
As a friendly reminder, please remember she is a "vocalist" not a "singer" -- there is a significant difference.

The distinction is subjective and usually best left to examples:

  • Singers = Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Dean Martin, Jack Jones, Liza Minnelli
  • Vocalists = Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Don Van Vliet [Captain Beefheart], Herb Alpert
Essentially, singers capture the formal, classic approach -- whereas vocalists work outside the box... (Additionally, a hallmark of many vocalists is that they can be quite limited in their technical abilities -- resulting in the standard assessment: if you don't like how they "sing" a song, you're probably not gonna like anything else they sing.)
 

Captaindave

Well-Known Member
JO said:
As a friendly reminder, please remember she is a "vocalist" not a "singer" -- there is a significant difference.

The distinction is subjective and usually best left to examples:

  • Singers = Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Dean Martin, Jack Jones, Liza Minnelli
  • Vocalists = Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Don Van Vliet [Captain Beefheart], Herb Alpert
Essentially, singers capture the formal, classic approach -- whereas vocalists work outside the box... (Additionally, a hallmark of many vocalists is that they can be quite limited in their technical abilities -- resulting in the standard assessment: if you don't like how they "sing" a song, you're probably not gonna like anything else they sing.)
Yes, I like this explanation quite a bit.

It is quite possible to be a vocalist without actually being a singer.

And yes, the names that might be included on various lists of vocalists and singers might vary.
 

JO

New Member
The one and only Cap'n D said:
Yes, I like this explanation quite a bit.

It is quite possible to be a vocalist without actually being a singer.

And yes, the names that might be included on various lists of vocalists and singers might vary.

I can't take authorship for the idea -- this was explained to me many years ago from a friend of mine who, I believe, learned of the idea from a voice instructor.

(There is also a third element as well: "voice" -- wherein one employs a wordless voice. If high-pitched women emulating theremins comes to mind, that's not too far off the mark -- at least for one noteworthy application -- for in the '50s/'60s studio world there was a high demand for wordless voices. Check out Norrie Paramor's Thirty-Three Stereophonic Strings...And A Girl as an example. It goes without saying that "wordless voice" artists were in demand for all those mood music / copulation LPs in the 1950s, not to mention the continuous underscoring dates for the Hollywood machine (Star Trek theme anyone?).


Mr. Moritat said:
Always puts a smile on my face to see a Don Van Vliet reference!
In my life I've had the opportunity to meet two musical artists of truly significant acclaim: Clare Fischer and Don Van Vliet. Don actually lived in the area where I attended college and I had the fortunate opportunity to chat with him at length about music on two occasions. He was a very nice, humble man.
 

cgwaters

New Member
I was introduced to Claudine Longet's voice on my father's Music Box A&M compilation album--in particular, the track "It's Hard To Say Goodbye". I find it to be a haunting tune and a beautiful arrangement. Does anyone know if it's available for individual purchase?
 

Ed Bishop

Member
Always puts a smile on my face to see a Don Van Vliet reference!
Makes me wanna go out to the patio and sing "Hobo Chang Ba" or, in tribute to his all-too-brief days with A&M, "Diddy Wah Diddy." :D

I picked "Snow" but the last track's pretty strong, too...this is the kind of music for a warm (but not hot) summer afternoon with a touch of breeze and a mint julep or margarita in hand. No, Claudine wasn't much of a singer, but so what? Within her limitations she can be quite enjoyable if you're in the mood. And anyway, if you need someone slightly heavier (if not by much) there's always Astrud Gilberto, whose music makes a great chaser anytime...:badteeth:

But of course, YMMV...:)

ED :)
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
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Just a little addendum to this old thread:

We have been watching the old TV show NORTHERN EXPOSURE and were up to the Season Two episode called "All Is Vanity". In it, there was a surprise reference to Claudine Longet's "Love Is Blue" as Maggie's father is describing her childhood.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
When Margaret was five, she was second runner-up in the Little Miss Great Lakes.
Really? A lot of our friends used to say, "Why do you push a kid into that for?" But it was all her idea.
She begged us to be in that pageant.
You never told me this, honey.
Well - What was that song you sang? - Oh, I-I don't remember, Dad.
The one that Andy Williams's wife sang.
The woman that shot the skier.
Claudine Longet.
"Love is Blue" That's right.
Margaret had a beautiful voice.
And what a little ham.

Read more: Northern Exposure s02e03 Episode Script | SS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I thought it was worth a mention.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
I always Enjoy Claudine's A&M albums I needledropped my vinyl years ago to CD and I'm so glad I did sadly I lost the LPs sometime after but I do see they were Availible for Downloading on Amazon I haven't checked lately but it's true she's an acquired taste musically and like others have stated one has to be in the right mood to listen to her still it's good to have them handy
 

Harry

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When A&M Corner was in its early days, our source for Japanese imports was an outfit called Thoughtscape Sounds. They seemed to have a link to all of the A&M product being released in Japan. One day they had a sale of many artists' CDs, and Claudine was one of them. I was able to pick up each of her first four A&M albums on CD from Japan for $9.99 each. That one transaction gave me an instant collection of an artist that had eluded me up until then.

There are times when I can enjoy Claudine's singing, and the last track on this album, "It's Hard To Say Goodbye" is a good one. It's a lush interpretation of this Roger Nichols-Paul Williams song. That song is also found on A&M's MUSIC BOX sampler.
 

LPJim

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Have all 5 A&M LPs and 4 on CD. Ebay wants $90 for the Japanese CD of 'RUN WILD RUN FREE' but that's a tad rich for my blood.

JB
 

Harry

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I managed to get a mini-LP CD of RUN WILD, RUN FREE when it was first offered, so I have all five her A&M albums on CD.
 
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