Come Saturday Morning info

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
Hello all,

I am looking for some info on what is obviously one of the most evocative songs of the late 1960s. Ok for me that is a bit of an understatement, as I am totally obsessed with this song. Given that, I am actually trying to track down as much info as possible about its creation and recording. This would include any material related to Fred Karlin and Dory Previn and how they came to get the gig to write the song, what were the directives from the studio, where the idea came from, how the music and lyrics evolved, how many iterations there were, etc.

As for the recording, I am interested in who the session musicians were that played on the track, who the arranger was, do the charts that were used by the musicians still exist? were Jim Brady, Mike Piano and Richard Shoff involved at all in the arrangement and production? how involved were Alan J. Pakula, Paramount or Boardwalk Pictures in the creation of the song as far as giving direction with regards to the mood or feeling they wanted from the track? was Liza Minelli involved at all at any stage? I am essentially trying to create as full and as detailed a "portrait" of this ineffably beautiful song as possible. Any thoughts on people to speak with, any info you may have, or any thoughts generally on the song would be most appreciated!

I am also wondering who owns the rights to the master, who owns the publishing, and who is responsible for the licensing.

Thanks very much!
 

rockdoctor

Well-Known Member
Hello all,

I am looking for some info on what is obviously one of the most evocative songs of the late 1960s. Ok for me that is a bit of an understatement, as I am totally obsessed with this song. Given that, I am actually trying to track down as much info as possible about its creation and recording. This would include any material related to Fred Karlin and Dory Previn and how they came to get the gig to write the song, what were the directives from the studio, where the idea came from, how the music and lyrics evolved, how many iterations there were, etc.

As for the recording, I am interested in who the session musicians were that played on the track, who the arranger was, do the charts that were used by the musicians still exist? were Jim Brady, Mike Piano and Richard Shoff involved at all in the arrangement and production? how involved were Alan J. Pakula, Paramount or Boardwalk Pictures in the creation of the song as far as giving direction with regards to the mood or feeling they wanted from the track? was Liza Minelli involved at all at any stage? I am essentially trying to create as full and as detailed a "portrait" of this ineffably beautiful song as possible. Any thoughts on people to speak with, any info you may have, or any thoughts generally on the song would be most appreciated!

I am also wondering who owns the rights to the master, who owns the publishing, and who is responsible for the licensing.

Thanks very much!
Your best bet would be to contact Paramount Pictures, the original producer of the film.
Dory Previn was a well known lyricist at the time and scored an Oscar nomination for "Valley Of The Dolls" just two years before.
 

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
Your best bet would be to contact Paramount Pictures, the original producer of the film.
Dory Previn was a well known lyricist at the time and scored an Oscar nomination for "Valley Of The Dolls" just two years before.

Hey thanks very much for that! I actually didn't know Dory Previn wrote the lyrics for the Valley Of The Dolls...
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
You may wish to also follow-up with critic, Richie Unterberger (at his website), who wrote the liner notes for the Collector's Choice CD re-issues years ago.

As for The Sandpiper's top-40 version, I recall the LP exhibited musician credits (mine is in storage otherwise, I'd give it a gander). I do recall that Nick DeCaro wrote the arrangement. His arrangements for Claudine's A&M cycle are notable.

(My two cents: conjecture tells me that A&M utilized the classic A&R approach with The Sandpipers for their recordings wherein A&R would select songs, arrangers, etc for given artists... A&M was still a relatively small company in 1969-70, so the number of in-house suits performing these tasks was probably limited (unless they farmed it out). Also, by 1970 the contemporary pop music landscape had changed to a different model where most newly signed solo artists were increasingly expected to write their own music and bands were self-contained units. I wouldn't be surprised if the three Sandpipers had little-to-no input with ultimate song selection or arrangement contribution with their music.)

I agree the arrangement and performance is nothing short of spellbinding -- capturing the essence of Southern California sunshine pop. I first heard it in 1978 quite by accident. I used to tune in to KNX (Los Angeles), at 10:10PM weeknights to listen to the CBS Mystery Theatre. One night KRLD -- from all the way in Texas -- skipped into the frequency and they were broadcasting Come Saturday Morning. I had never heard the song and immediately I thought it was The Association. I went to the record shop to confirm the artist and that was when I learned it was The Sandpipers. At that time all that was available was the 45 (of all things) -- so I ordered it up! Years later I bought the LP -- but was disappointed that It didn't live up the the magic of that one song.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
"Come Saturday Morning" was also sung by Liza Minnelli on her album where it was the title track. She's been in the cast of THE STERILE CUCKOO, and though she didn't sing the song in the movie, A&M wanted her, a star of the film, to record the song for them.

(Did we do this song as one of the "A&M Cover Versions:" shootouts?) (Also, did we ever do "The Drifter"? Pisano & Ruff, Sandpipers, Roger Nichols)
 

rockdoctor

Well-Known Member
"Come Saturday Morning" was also sung by Liza Minnelli on her album where it was the title track. She's been in the cast of THE STERILE CUCKOO, and though she didn't sing the song in the movie, A&M wanted her, a star of the film, to record the song for them.

(Did we do this song as one of the "A&M Cover Versions:" shootouts?) (Also, did we ever do "The Drifter"? Pisano & Ruff, Sandpipers, Roger Nichols)
I do not remember it for the shootout but Sandpipers should win by a huge landslide for Come Saturday Morning!!!
 

Mr Bill

Gentlemanly Curmudgeon
Staff member
Moderator
The Come Saturday Morning album was the last Sandpipers LP to chart, largely on the inclusion of the title song (featured in the Liza Minnelli movie The Sterile Cuckoo) and the song "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" featured in the Russ Meyer campy cult classic film of the same name.

The Sandpipers did one final album for A&M, 1971's A Gift of Song. That final A&M LP featured only two of the three pipers, Jim Brady and Michael Piano -- Richard Schoff opted out of it.

Five years later in 1976, they released a tenth album, Overdue, in the UK (on the Satril records label) and Asian markets only. Schoff returned for this one, but Michael Piano was replaced by Gary Duckworth. This album is notable for the song "You're a Great Way to Fly (Singapore Girl)" which is used to this day as Singapore Airlines jingle/theme song,

One more album followed,1977's Ay Ay Ay Manila, released only in (you guessed it) the Philippines.

--Mr Bill
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
(Did we do this song as one of the "A&M Cover Versions:" shootouts?) (Also, did we ever do "The Drifter"? Pisano & Ruff, Sandpipers, Roger Nichols
  • The Drifter: Oddly enough, for some unknown reason I didn't prepare the "A&M Covers Versions" post for this 3-way shoot-out even though it was on my old list. I will do so soon.
  • Come Saturday Morning: I think cover versions of this selection were limited to just two A&M recording artists; however, for the A&M Cover Version shoot-outs I was focusing on 3 or more artists. I'll assess some potential two-artist shoot-outs for the same period (approx. 1965-70)...perhaps we can revisit some of these after we look at some of the Herb Alpert suggestions from Mike B. and Mr Bill. Thanks.
 

rockdoctor

Well-Known Member
  • The Drifter: Oddly enough, for some unknown reason I didn't prepare the "A&M Covers Versions" post for this 3-way shoot-out even though it was on my old list. I will do so soon.
  • Come Saturday Morning: I think cover versions of this selection were limited to just two A&M recording artists; however, for the A&M Cover Version shoot-outs I was focusing on 3 or more artists. I'll assess some potential two-artist shoot-outs for the same period (approx. 1965-70)...perhaps we can revisit some of these after we look at some of the Herb Alpert suggestions from Mike B. and Mr Bill. Thanks.
You did one shoot out for two with Sandpipers and Chris Montez for Yesterday. You did give the opportunity to abstain but I do not think that was necessary.
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Come Saturday Morning was the first Sandpipers album I heard. I think I'd probably heard the title song on the radio, but I don't remember. My first copy of it was on 8-track, like a lot of other albums at that time.

To me the album seemed to be a very light-handed attempt to make the Sandpipers be more hip and with-it. Consider:

- This was the first album they appeared on the front cover (holding a guitar, yet....these guys really are rockers!) (I'm not counting Spanish Album, which they appeared on but they were so far away you couldn't see their faces. Also I'm not counting back covers, maybe they're pictured on one or two of those... memory fades.)

- This was the first album to feature any significant "solo" vocalizing

- The soulful female vocalizing at the end of the album (on "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands") was pretty wild, for an E-Z listening album especially.

But, at the end of the day it was all just too mellow and while the album did decent business, they went back to the tried and true graphic formula for their next album cover: No group photo anywhere, a pretty girl on the cover, and ... no guitar. But they kept the solo vocals and that last album did have a couple of really good songs on it, my favorite being "Leland Loftis."
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
But, at the end of the day it was all just too mellow and while the album did decent business, they went back to the tried and true graphic formula for their next album cover:
That next LP is probably their best -- at least the "comatoseometer" is reading lower than all the preceding LPs. Was it ever released in the US? For some reason I thought it was only released in Japan...
 

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
That next LP is probably their best -- at least the "comatoseometer" is reading lower than all the preceding LPs. Was it ever released in the US? For some reason I thought it was only released in Japan...

Speaking of comatose, their version of Louie Louie is quite bizarre--like they are all on Percocet!
 

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
The Come Saturday Morning album was the last Sandpipers LP to chart, largely on the inclusion of the title song (featured in the Liza Minnelli movie The Sterile Cuckoo) and the song "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" featured in the Russ Meyer campy cult classic film of the same name.

The Sandpipers did one final album for A&M, 1971's A Gift of Song. That final A&M LP featured only two of the three pipers, Jim Brady and Michael Piano -- Richard Schoff opted out of it.

Five years later in 1976, they released a tenth album, Overdue, in the UK (on the Satril records label) and Asian markets only. Schoff returned for this one, but Michael Piano was replaced by Gary Duckworth. This album is notable for the song "You're a Great Way to Fly (Singapore Girl)" which is used to this day as Singapore Airlines jingle/theme song,

One more album followed,1977's Ay Ay Ay Manila, released only in (you guessed it) the Philippines.

--Mr Bill

Thanks for the info. I was curious how popular the Sandpipers were in general. Guantanamera was obviously huge, but I'm not sure they had anything else as big as that one and CSM? I know they covered Softly As I Leave You--that did alright for them I think. I suppose their biggest competitor sound wise were The Lettermen? It's also interesting how many songs they sang in Spanish--wonder if that was a deliberate effort to attract Latin audience or just part of the zeitgeist of the time--Jobim etc. I imagine their audience was very 'adult'--definitely not a rock audience I reckon.
 

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
Come Saturday Morning was the first Sandpipers album I heard. I think I'd probably heard the title song on the radio, but I don't remember. My first copy of it was on 8-track, like a lot of other albums at that time.

To me the album seemed to be a very light-handed attempt to make the Sandpipers be more hip and with-it. Consider:

- This was the first album they appeared on the front cover (holding a guitar, yet....these guys really are rockers!) (I'm not counting Spanish Album, which they appeared on but they were so far away you couldn't see their faces. Also I'm not counting back covers, maybe they're pictured on one or two of those... memory fades.)

- This was the first album to feature any significant "solo" vocalizing

- The soulful female vocalizing at the end of the album (on "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands") was pretty wild, for an E-Z listening album especially.

But, at the end of the day it was all just too mellow and while the album did decent business, they went back to the tried and true graphic formula for their next album cover: No group photo anywhere, a pretty girl on the cover, and ... no guitar. But they kept the solo vocals and that last album did have a couple of really good songs on it, my favorite being "Leland Loftis."

That Leland Loftis is a great song! 2:49 of pure baroque pop. It's interesting your noting the rising use of the solo voice as time went on--that's an element that unfortunately made them a lot more generic sounding IMO. But maybe those lush blended voices were considered kind of passé by the early 70s. You make a good point about the way the label tried to promote them more as a "group" with the CSM cover. I hadn't really thought about it, but I guess it was a fairly common practice not to feature "pop" artists on album covers. It was certainly a rule of thumb with pop instrumental acts like Ray Conniff, Bert Kaempfert, Percy Faith etc. It's actually interesting how few photos of the Sandpipers there are. Maybe a dozen publicity shots....

RSD12639_810x.jpeg
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
^ That's definitely from 1970. (Finally getting a bit hip, I see (dig the sunglasses hanging out the pocket...) -- but, alas too little too late; I mean these guys were still wearing pompadours in '67.)

All things considered, along with Come Saturday Morning, the song, Glass, is a 5-star knockout! (Dig the cool Danelectro bass!)

 

AM Matt

Well-Known Member
Also the late Joe Reisman, his orchestra & chorus did a great version of "Come Saturday Morning" (from Readers Digest 1971 or 1972 "Sweet With A Beat" 6 record set).
 

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
^ That's definitely from 1970. (Finally getting a bit hip, I see (dig the sunglasses hanging out the pocket...) -- but, alas too little too late; I mean these guys were still wearing pompadours in '67.)

All things considered, along with Come Saturday Morning, the song, Glass, is a 5-star knockout! (Dig the cool Danelectro bass!)

That's a very cool track. Yea I guess the Sandpipers were pretty square--they did meet in a choir after all! Neat little piece on the arranger of CSM, Nick DeCaro--quite a storied guy I guess. Played accordion on the Rolling Stones’ “Back Street Girl” of all things.

 

Hiraeth

New Member
Thread Starter
You may wish to also follow-up with critic, Richie Unterberger (at his website), who wrote the liner notes for the Collector's Choice CD re-issues years ago.

As for The Sandpiper's top-40 version, I recall the LP exhibited musician credits (mine is in storage otherwise, I'd give it a gander). I do recall that Nick DeCaro wrote the arrangement. His arrangements for Claudine's A&M cycle are notable.

(My two cents: conjecture tells me that A&M utilized the classic A&R approach with The Sandpipers for their recordings wherein A&R would select songs, arrangers, etc for given artists... A&M was still a relatively small company in 1969-70, so the number of in-house suits performing these tasks was probably limited (unless they farmed it out). Also, by 1970 the contemporary pop music landscape had changed to a different model where most newly signed solo artists were increasingly expected to write their own music and bands were self-contained units. I wouldn't be surprised if the three Sandpipers had little-to-no input with ultimate song selection or arrangement contribution with their music.)

I agree the arrangement and performance is nothing short of spellbinding -- capturing the essence of Southern California sunshine pop. I first heard it in 1978 quite by accident. I used to tune in to KNX (Los Angeles), at 10:10PM weeknights to listen to the CBS Mystery Theatre. One night KRLD -- from all the way in Texas -- skipped into the frequency and they were broadcasting Come Saturday Morning. I had never heard the song and immediately I thought it was The Association. I went to the record shop to confirm the artist and that was when I learned it was The Sandpipers. At that time all that was available was the 45 (of all things) -- so I ordered it up! Years later I bought the LP -- but was disappointed that It didn't live up the the magic of that one song.

Thanks for this--your take on the corporate landscape for contemporary pop ca. 1970 is super interesting. As you say, one imagines things would have shifted very dramatically with the coming of singer-songwriter era.
 
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