Herb Alpert Presents Pete Jolly

Harry

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I never thought that this album was ever re-issued, but I just spotted this on eBay. It appears to be a mid-70s pressing of HERB ALPERT PRESENTS PETE JOLLY.

Herb Alpert Presents Pete Jolly-1975 Press A&M Stereo-SHRINK-M-/-M UNPLAYED JAZZ | eBay »



The weird part is that the jacket has a promo sticker. Why would A&M be promoting this album in the mid-70s?



In the past few days, I spotted a mono promo of this on eBay and grabbed it. It was WAY less than the one that's been out there forever for $199. I'll be eager to hear this when it arrives and compare it to the stereo version.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
I have a vintage white label promo version of this along with a nice needledrop cd i think the reason A&M might have been promoting this album is that they might have been targeting Easy Listening/jazz Radio back in the 70s i know of one station close to where i was living at the time was playing the track "Amy's Theme" from this lp in regular rotation along with a few others and judging by the white/Silver/tan A&M label this was pressed on. It is my opinion that it might have been either reissued or there were plans to reissue it. Then again i may be wrong. But its just a guess on my part but I love this Album and im glad to have it in my collection it should have Been released on CD. But thankfully i have my needledrop
 

Rudy

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Weird about the label above--it does not feature the standard typefaces for the silver label. It still reuses the typesetting from the original tan-label version. Never have seen that before.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
Weird about the label above--it does not feature the standard typefaces for the silver label. It still reuses the typesetting from the original tan-label version. Never have seen that before.
My first copy of Wes montgomery's Greatest Hits Had that same label situation silver label with the reused type setting from the original ochre label. So it has happened before.
 

Michael Hagerty

Well-Known Member
The answer is in the sticker. When a radio station would ask for a copy of a catalog item (something other than a current release), there were two ways they could get it. Most labels had a program where stations could buy back catalog at wholesale. The stations that didn't have an established, ongoing relationship with the label usually ended up paying, and you'd get sent a nice, clean shrink-wrapped copy that would normally get sent to distributors for eventual retail sale.

If you did have a good relationship, though, you'd get it for free. But the labels' accounting practices required considering promo copies the property of the label, loaned to the radio station for airplay (though I don't know of a single case of a label ever getting a promo copy back)...so if you got it for free, they'd take a stock copy, drill a hole in the cover and slap a "PROMOTIONAL COPY NOT FOR SALE" sticker on it.

So, sometime after 1973 (the seller says it was '75), most likely a station building a library asked for a copy and got it.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
The answer is in the sticker. When a radio station would ask for a copy of a catalog item (something other than a current release), there were two ways they could get it. Most labels had a program where stations could buy back catalog at wholesale. The stations that didn't have an established, ongoing relationship with the label usually ended up paying, and you'd get sent a nice, clean shrink-wrapped copy that would normally get sent to distributors for eventual retail sale.

If you did have a good relationship, though, you'd get it for free. But the labels' accounting practices required considering promo copies the property of the label, loaned to the radio station for airplay (though I don't know of a single case of a label ever getting a promo copy back)...so if you got it for free, they'd take a stock copy, drill a hole in the cover and slap a "PROMOTIONAL COPY NOT FOR SALE" sticker on it.

So, sometime after 1973 (the seller says it was '75), most likely a station building a library asked for a copy and got it.
I work in radio so what you described is very much true unfortunately we had some sticky fingered DJs in the past Stealing our vinyl and Cds and i can only cringe when i think about the possibility of a Label asking for a promo copy back and the station being unable to do so because of the item being stolen however we have a very Strict policy against theft they even had to install security cameras in the library.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
My needledrop CD copy of this great album is only one of many that I added to my laptop music mix it's wonderful to be able to quickly access music like this to me this would have to be my favorite Pete Jolly album
 

TjbBmb

New Member
I think this album would of been much better with Nick Ceroli on drums, and Julius Wechter on marimba and vibes. Although Pete Jolly plays great as usual and the material is very good, the rhythm section just sounds uninspired...
 
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