🎵 AotW Classics Herb Alpert/Tijuana Brass SOUTH OF THE BORDER

What is your favorite track?

  • South Of The Border

    Votes: 5 17.2%
  • The Girl From Ipanema

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hello, Dolly!

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Up Cherry Street

    Votes: 4 13.8%
  • Mexican Shuffle

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • El Presidente

    Votes: 5 17.2%
  • All My Loving

    Votes: 2 6.9%
  • Angelito

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Salud, Amor Y Dinero

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • Numero Cinco

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • Adios, Mi Corazon

    Votes: 5 17.2%

  • Total voters
    29

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
Thread Starter
Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass
SOUTH OF THE BORDER

A&M SP-4108

sp4108.jpg


Tracks:
Side One:
1. South Of The Border {Kennedy-Carr} [2:06]
2. The Girl From Ipanema {Gimbel-Jobim-De Moraes} [2:35]
3. Hello, Dolly! {Jerry Herman} [1:55]
4. I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face {Lerner-Loew} [2:25]
5. Up Cherry Street {Julius Wechter} [2:13]
6. Mexican Shuffle {Sol Lake} [2:09]

Side Two:
1. El Presidente {Sol Lake} [2:28]
2. All My Loving {McCartney-Lennon} [1:53]
3. Angelito {Herrera-Ornellas} [2:20]
4. Salud, Amor y Dinero {Sol Lake} [2:05]
5. Numero Cinco {Ervan Coleman} [2:15]
6. Adios, Mi Corazon {Sol Lake} [2:39]

Produced by: Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss
Arranged by: Herb Alpert
Engineered by: Larry Levine
Album Designed by: Apple Graphics
Recorded at Gold Star Recording Studio

Liner Notes:

Welcome to another dozen great songs with the modern mariachi touch of Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass. "South Of The Border" is the third set from this rousing versatile group. We have every reason to believe that you will enjoy this album at least as much as the other two best-selling works. Please sit back, relax and enjoy thirty minutes or so of the most original and exciting instrumental congregation on record, Herb Alpert and his Tijuana Brass . . . .

Released on LP as SP-4108 (stereo) and LP-108 (mono). Also released on CD as A&M CD 3263 and currently as Shout! Factory DK 32772.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
Thread Starter
Recording oddity: There are at least two different stereo mixes of "I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face". Once version has the opening mandolin "travel" from the left channel to the right, while the other version has the mandolin locked to the right channel the whole time. The A&M CD has the travelling mandolin, the Shout! Factory disc has it locked to the right channel.

There are two different versions of "Numero Cinco". One features a pre-song intro by a Spanish-speaking recording engineer, the other does not. We used to think that it was a mono/stereo thing, but that's proven not to be true. The A&M CD featured the recording engineer, the Shout! Factory disc does not.

Harry
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
To me this is a "bridge" album between the original TJB sound and the "heyday" TJB sound. The elements that made the band superstars are almost in place; just a touch more "Americanizing" was needed.

The first 3 TJB albums are my "bottom three" in preference, but this is the best of those three in my opinion.
 

Captaindave

Well-Known Member
This is my favorite of the early TJB albums, and IMO, introduces the basic elements of the "sound", although I do agree that the "heyday" sound was yet to arrive. I think that happened with Going Places.

Although the sound did evolve, mature, and adjust as time went on toward the end of the sixties, I think this album is kind of a "foundation" upon which the remainder of the decade rests.

I remember this album to be one I often found myself listening to whenever I wanted to hear the TJB on my record player, even toward the end of the sixties, and after the later albums had been released, (I will say that back then, I found these songs on my Longines Symphonette collection as I didn't yet have the first four albums themselves at that time).

I agree that the gradual movement away from the Mexican concept probably helped the eventual rise in popularity of the sound over time. But, I still find this album and these songs as my point of beginning for the rest of the decade.

I went with "El Presidente" as the favorite track, although it could have just as easily been the title track, Up Cherry Street, or Mexican Shuffle. While I wouldn't say the entire album is equally strong in terms of songs - I don't think it is - I like them all anyway.
 

Steve Sidoruk

Founder, A&M Fan Net
Staff member
Moderator
SOB+ALT+COVR+PIX.jpg

Another photo from the same shoot - it was used on the
Spanish Flea sheet music and as cover art for some overseas
singles and EPs.

SOB+top+logo.jpg

SP 108 first pressing.

SOB+SP3263.jpg

SP 3263 last pressing. The catalog number had changed to reflect the mid-price line,
shortly after, the vinyl was gone & replaced by CD 3263.

SOBSP408juke.jpg

SP 408 Stereo jukebox Little LP tan label.

SOBSP408jukewhite.jpg

SP 408 Stereo jukebox Litte LP white label.

Recording session info:

4/20/64 - Gold Star Recording Studios - Mexican Shuffle, The Shuffle - Herb Alpert - trumpet, Julius Wechter - marimba, Ray Pohlman - bass, Bill Pitman - guitar, Carol Kaye - bass, Bud Coleman - guitar & mandolin, Hal Blaine - drums.

8/18/64 - Gold Star Recording Studios - Hello Dolly, All My Loving, Angelito, Sol's Tune 1 - Herb Alpert - trumpet, Julius Wechter - marimba, Ray Pohlman - bass, Tommy Tedesco - guitar, Bud Coleman - guitar & mandolin, Hal Blaine - drums.

8/21/64 - Gold Star Recording Studios - Sol's Tune 2, Girl From Ipanema, I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face, South Of The Border - Herb Alpert - trumpet, Julius Wechter - marimba, Ray Pohlman - bass, Tommy Tedesco - guitar, Bud Coleman - guitar & mandolin, Hal Blaine - drums, Russell Bridges - piano, Lew McCreary - trombone, Dave Wells, trombone, Bill Pitman - guitar, Jerry Williams - drums & percussion.

Notes: I know the above is missing a couple tracks, but the source just didn't list them all.

This is the first TJB album to be engineered by Larry Levine. Turn the volume way up , play side 1, track 1 - South Of The Border and listen to that "wall of sound!" This was the 1st TJB album that I bought in 1964, at age 12. All these years later, it is still my favorite!
 

Captain Bacardi

Well-Known Member
Moderator
I always loved the sound of this album. Such an improvement over Volume 2! My favorite track is the swinging version of "All My Loving", followed closely by the rocking "South Of The Border". Always a fun album to listen to!



Capt. Bacardi
 

DAN BOLTON

Well-Known Member
This is the hardest album for me to pick a favorite from...I always like to listen to the entire album at once. Herb HAD to know he was on to something when this record was finished; it's that good. Everything just seems to jell here...the album just cooks! I went with NUMERO CINCO because it's my first favorite TJB tune. The melody is almost unbelieveably simple, and the chord structure/progression is, too; but the overall tune is a real gem, one of the most enjoyable songs in the TJB catalogue.


Dan
 

nightcat

Member
Haven't listened to this lp for years. Saw this topic and I played it earlier tonight. I forgot how pleasant this album is. My favorite tune would be Up Cherry Street, although I really like El Presidente, Hello Dolly and All My Loving as well. Actually the only thing on the lp I don't care for is their heavy handed treatment of Girl From Ipanema. This album sure was a step up from Volume 2.
 

Captaindave

Well-Known Member
nightcat said:
Actually the only thing on the lp I don't care for is their heavy handed treatment of Girl From Ipanema. This album sure was a step up from Volume 2.

I have always felt the same way about Girl From Ipanema. I have always liked the song a lot; especially the 1964 version with Astrud Gilberto singing (and Stan Getz on sax, if my memory is correct).

I also wish the TJB version had a "lighter" feel - I would have been much more attracted to that kind of arrangement. Perhaps something more like Tangerine...
 

DAN BOLTON

Well-Known Member
From the personnel listed in Steve's post, I'm guessing that THE SHUFFLE is probably NUMERO CINCO, and SOL'S TUNE #1 became SALUD, AMOR y DINERO; SOL'S TUNE #2 was probably ADIOS MI CORAZON. I'm basing this on the overall sound of the other tunes recorded in each session, and the instruments involved.

Did we ever confirm that John Pisano first played with Herb on UP CHERRY STREET? It certainly sounds like he does to me...but I certainly could be wrong.


Dan
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
A more truer "TjB sound" is established...! As well as something clearly leaning more towards the EZ List'nin' axis of the Pop music world than the first two... It helps, too, that the up-and-coming practice of covering Beatles songs was also setting precedence here, too...



Dave
 
I had to vote for Numero Cinco for one simple reason. I own a copy of the record version of this album, although I hadn't listened to it in years. Outside of Mexican Shuffle (which I had on Classics, Volume 1) and Girl from Ipanema and Hello Dolly from Four-Sider, which I had become reaccustomed to, Numero Cinco was the one song from the record that I was able to instantly pick out the first time I listened to the CD and say to myself "I used to LOVE this song". So I'm voting for it.
 

toeknee4bz

Well-Known Member
Steve Sidoruk said:
SOB+top+logo.jpg

SP 108 first pressing.

SOB+SP3263.jpg

SP 3263 last pressing.[/quote]

One thing has always perplexed me concerning the older A&M pressings. That is, each side was catalogued with an LP/SP number twice the value of that of the album LP/SP number (e.g. LP or SP 108 SOUTH OF THE BORDER side A listed in parentheses as LP or SP 115 and side B as LP or SP 116). Very confusing.

On the later pressings, each side would be catalogued by the album SP number "-A" or "-B" (e.g. SP 3263 SOUTH OF THE BORDER side A listed as SP 03263-A and side B as SP 03263-B).

Two questions: 1) Why didn't they do it this way from the start? ; 2) When did the switch occur? (I'm assuming it changed when A&M left the ochre design for the silver/white design... ???)

Tony
 

Steve Sidoruk

Founder, A&M Fan Net
Staff member
Moderator
I don't know why they numbered the way they did, but it did make some kind of sense - two sides per album and these SP numbers went up accordingly. The later numbering scheme was perfectly clear - the album SP number, then a-side, b-side.

For more mind boggling numbers - after A&M was sold to PolyGram, the UPC (bar code) numbers changed. Everything that was already released stayed the same. All new releases got a new UPC prefix number. Part of the sales deal had something called "earn outs." If product released under Alpert & Moss ownership performed well after the sale, the vendors (Mr. A. & Mr. M.) would receive additional compensation from PolyGram. Seemingly a very smart aspect of the sales deal!
 

gkozak

New Member
Most incorrectly conjure only light-hearted, perky pieces such as "Tijuana Taxi" when they think of Herb Alpert and the TJB. "Adios Mi Corazon" is a tune that reflects a deeper side of the band that is not sufficiently appreciated. Many other pieces do as well, such as "Bud," "For Carlos," and even later compositions such as "Sandbox" by John Pisano, "Carmine," and "A Song For Herb." There's much more to this man's music than many people realize.
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
gkozak said:
..."Adios Mi Corazon" is a tune that reflects a deeper side of the band that is not sufficiently appreciated. Many other pieces do as well, such as "Bud," "For Carlos,"...There's much more to this man's music than many people realize.
Touche`!
 

DAN BOLTON

Well-Known Member
JO said:
gkozak said:
..."Adios Mi Corazon" is a tune that reflects a deeper side of the band that is not sufficiently appreciated. Many other pieces do as well, such as "Bud," "For Carlos,"...There's much more to this man's music than many people realize.
Touche`!

Don't forget I'LL BE BACK from TBAC and AND I LOVE HER from LT. And, while we're at it, THE NICEST THINGS HAPPEN from SUMMERTIME should be on the list; so should SHE TOUCHED ME from TBOTB. Some others...LADYFINGERS and LEMON TREE from WCAOD.

I'm rather partial to THE CHARMER from SOUNDS LIKE and MOMENTS from TBAC, too...also SPANISH HARLEM from VOL 2.

The list goes on, should be a new thread...



Dan
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Hi, Mr. Bill -- Gkozak's mention of Adios Mi Corazon -- probably my all-time Herb/TJB fave -- pulled me out of my crypt.

Words cannot describe the melancholy beauty Mr. Alpert and his musical artists create... The sadness in his horn coupled with the solitary violins and mournful voice has the power to make eyes water -- particularly so as the performance never resolves.
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thank you, Dave --

As I recall, ironically enough, it was a previous South of the Border thread that cornered me back in '07 so it was fitting that another SOTB thread do likewise; this time, however, I'm keeping my avatar close at hand to watch over the proceedings -- keeping my aim true (ala Elvis C!).

I trust you and Mr Bill have been contributing your usual keen insights to the proceedings.
 
Top Bottom