Hutch and Burton

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
Speaking of Hutch and Burton -- these are my two all-time faves, both cut in 1967.

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JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
Duster, Lofty Fake anagram, In Concert, and Country Roads are all five star albums recorded in succession. They represent Gary Burton’s innovative group at their peak.
Absolutely! TjbBmb nails it! This is 1967-68 and Gary's very much aware of the pop revolution underway -- underscored given his choice of electric guitarists, Larry Coryell or Jeff Hahn. If you fancy those albums, you may also consider one release prior (Tennessee Firebird [SEP66]) and one release beyond (Throb [JUN69]). To me, these are not at the 5-star standard as the other four, yet are surely strong records and quite listenable.
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
Oh, there's also this one -- more of an one-off offering, I suppose -- featuring the compositions of Carla Bley. This one was released between Anagram and In Concert. It's essential if only to capture the spirit of the late '60s.

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Moritat

Well-Known Member
"Country Roads" is a very good lp, but not as good as the outstanding "Duster". With Haynes, Coryell & Swallow, that was a killer lineup. Especially like the Carl Bley song "Sing Me Softly Of The Blues". Coryell shines on that one. "General Mojo" is excellent as well. "Lofty Fake Anagram" is another favorite of mine. Possibly his most underrated RCA lp. The "Genuine Tong Funeral" lp is unusual, but that's what makes it interesting. I actually have a videotape of Burton & his group performing this entire album on a Boston based show called "Mixed Bag" on WGBH. It was the last episode before Mixed Bag went off the air. All in all, I loved Burton on RCA.
 

Moritat

Well-Known Member
One more.

Who is Gary Burton from 1962.
On the RCA lps with Burton, it's interesting to hear the musical evolution of the artist as well as seeing how his look dramatically changed over a short period of time. From the photo on the back of "Who Is" to his long hair look on Duster is quite a change! I do recall "Throb" and an unusual song called "Chickens". And one more excellent lp was his Atlantic pairing with Keith Jarrett which had a terrific Steve Swallow number called "Como En Vietnam".
 

TjbBmb

Well-Known Member
It’s interesting that you say that because according to Pat Metheny, when he first had the opportunity to record his first album as a leader, Gary told him to wait and really think about what he wanted to do.

Apparently, Gary was unhappy with his first couple of albums and wished he had waited until he had a real clear vision of what he wanted to say musically.
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
One more.

Who is Gary Burton from 1962
Thanks, TjbBmb -- Somehow I missed that one...I'll need to check it out -- Clark Terry's on it!


On the RCA lps with Burton, it's interesting to hear the musical evolution of the artist as well as seeing how his look dramatically changed over a short period of time. From the photo on the back of "Who Is" to his long hair look on Duster is quite a change! I do recall "Throb" and an unusual song called "Chickens". And one more excellent lp was his Atlantic pairing with Keith Jarrett which had a terrific Steve Swallow number called "Como En Vietnam".
That's the next LP -- cut in JUL70. Swallow's contributions are central to the group's late '60s evolution. You previously mentioned General Mojo: that's the performance I play for those who insist jazz/rock fusion began with Miles' Stuff (MAY68). Not that it matters, but for history's sake, Gary was about 6 months ahead of Miles (as Miles's first foray into jazz/rock fusion commenced with Circle In The Round (DEC67)).

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Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
Site Admin
I can't find it on YouTube, but the Chick Corea/Gary Burton album Duet on ECM had their version of Corea's "La Fiesta" that outshines the version on Corea's Return to Forever album.

The only thing I can find is "Duet Suite" from the same album. A continuation of the Crystal Silence ideas.

 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
I can't find it on YouTube, but the Chick Corea/Gary Burton album Duet on ECM had their version of Corea's "La Fiesta" that outshines the version on Corea's Return to Forever album.
Oh, my! I hadn't thought about that in 40 years! Yes, a friend played that for me in High School. I need to look for that release now. Thanks a million, Rudy!
 

Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
Site Admin
My first time hearing "La Fiesta" was via a trio in high school. The drummer/percussionist lived next door to twin brothers who play guitar/bass and keyboards, all immensely talented. All three currently teach at colleges around the country. They played a brief set as a trio, with "La Fiesta" being the last of the set--the same arrangement but with bass added. And following that, George Benson (the saxophonist, not the guitarist) joined them as the headliner. I still have that taped to cassette somewhere. It finally took me connecting with one of the twins over a dozen years ago to find what tune that was, as I could not remember much of it. That may have been what spurred me finding the Return to Forever albums and listening to more of Chick Corea's music than I had previously.
 

JOv2

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
La Fiesta. The lab band I played in during my first year in college (1981-82) took a stab at it; but for some reason it was yanked from rehearsal in favour of something else. Too bad; I know all us trumpeters liked it (plus we had a good screech-and-reach guy on lead who was all hyped for it).
 
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