🎵 AOTW Jack Daugherty - THE CLASS OF 1971 (SP-3038)

Captain Bacardi

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Jack Daugherty
JACK DAUGHERTY AND THE CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY ONE

A&M SP-3038


Released 1971

Format: Vinyl/8-Track

Produced by Jack Daugherty

Songs:
  • 1. Getting Up - 3:55
    Trumpet Solo by Chuck Findley

    2. Someone To Love - 3:28
    Vibraphone Solo by Milt Jackson

    3. Feel So Good - 3:50
    Guitar Solo by Mike Deasy

    4. (I Fell In Love With You) The Day We Met - 4:00

    5. Brothers And Sisters - 3:32
    Flute Solo by Jim Horn/Guitar Solo by Louie Shelton

    6. Number Nine - 3:07
    Trombone Solo by David Dahlsten

    7. The Strip - 4:23
    Trombone Solo by David Dahlsten

    8. La Costa Drive - 3:00
    Tenor Solo by Ron Starr

    9. You Got It - 3:00
    Trumpet Solo by Chuck Findley

    10. Theme For Susan - 2:36
    Alto Solo by Marshall Royal/Trumpet Solo by Chuck Findley

    All selections composed and arranged by Jack Daugherty and published by Orange Tree Music (ASCAP)

Musicians:
Jack Daugherty - Piano
Trumpets: Chuck Findley, Ollie Mitchell, Ron Gorow, Paul Hubinon, John Audino
Trombones: David Dahlsten, Charlie Loper, Tommy Shepard, Dick McQuarry, Don Waldrop, Dick Hyde
Saxophones: Ron Starr, Alan Beutler, Don Menza, Marshall Royal
Flute: Jim Horn
Drums: Jeff Porcaro, Jim Keltner, Hal Blaine, Paul Humphrey
Bass: Max Bennett, Joe Osborn, Ray Brown
Guitars: Louie Shelton, Larry Carlton, Dennis Budimir, Joe Pass
French Horns: Marnie Johnson, Alan Robinson, Dave Duke
Percussion: Bobby Torres, Gary Coleman
Vocalists: Ron Hicklin, Gene Morford, Clydie King, Venetta Fields, Jackie Ward
Violins: Erno Neufeld (Concertmaster), Jerry Reisler, George Kast, Bill Nuttycombe, Nate Ross, Gerri Vinci, Arnold Belnick, Marshall Sosson, Paul Shure, Marilyn Baker, Bernie Kundell, Israel Baker
Violas: Sam Boghossian, Garey Nuttycombe, Alan Harshman, Virginia Majewski
Cellos: Ed Lustgarten, Fred Seykora, Jackie Lustgarten, Ray Kelley

Engineer: Ray Gerhardt
Assistant Engineer: Robert Appére
Mastering Engineer: Bernie Grundman
Orchestra Manager: Jules Chaiken
Album Coordinator: Noel Woodman

Art Direction: Roland Young
Album Design: Chuck Beeson
Front Cover Illustration: Lanning Stern
Photography: Jim McCrary
Front Cover: Al Kramer
Liner Notes: Dan Clements



Capt. Bacardi
 

A&M Retro

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I've got a mint copy of the single that was released from this album. Nice instrumentals! How's the rest of the album?
 

Harry

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I've got the full album, and I still don't think I've ever listened to it...

Harry
 

Rudy

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A&Mguyfromwayback said:
Is this jazz? Easy listening?

I found an old post by Captain B.:

This has always been an interesting album to listen to. A nice mixture of styles, although the second side of the LP is a lot more jazzier than the first. Chuck Findley gets in some nice blowing space on "Getting Up" and "You Got It". My favorite tune is the bluesy "The Strip", with a nice trombone solo by David Dahlsten. "La Costa Drive" is a very hip swinger. Not an earth shattering album, but still nice to listen to. 3 & 1/2 stars.

Another post by Jim Mc.:

I finally found of copy of this(DJ promo,naturally-I have never seen a retail copy) at our local Music Expo. It is full of expectations and surprises. I would have expected this to be a nice,polite well recorded instrumental album. Well recorded,it is. But it is all original compositions and much jazzier than I would have thought. The cream of LA musicians(Hall Blaine Joe Osborne and Chuck Findley are just a few-guess with it being Daugherty's album Larry Knechtel didn't need to show up for keyboard duty). The short timings also do not give you a clue as how jazzy these pieces are and I suspect that was its shortcoming when it was released-too jazzy for MOR radio and too polished for other formats). Boy,Chuck Findley really gets to shine as an individual here,not the chameleon costume he is usually relegated to wearing. Very reminiscent of Bacharach's A&M work.
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
I like the "yearbook" in it which shows some of the musicians w/ their instruments...

And this is the only place where you ever even saw some of 'em ever photographed... (Like Paul Humphrey, Marni Johnson, and the "violin professor"-looking Erno Neufeld...)

Wish I still had my copy of at least the cover (which, minus the wax, got washed out in a flood, in 2003)...



Dave
 

Mr Bill

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A&Mguyfromwayback said:
Is this jazz? Easy listening?

Yes. It's hard to describe exactly, but given it was numbered into A&M's jazz series (SP 3000 series) it can be considered jazz. I find it more comparable, in a minor way, to Michel Colombier's Wings minus the big name vocalists and (at the time) high-profile lyricist. A non-LP single ("Stop" b/w "Brothers & Sisters") only enhances this comparison IMHO.

An enjoyable album. Even though Mr. Daugherty did other albums for other labels, many who don't care for this one consider it A&M's "payment" to Daugherty for his successful producing of Carpenters initial A&M recordings (and his contributions on that front are often debated by hardcore Carps fans).

--Mr Bill
 

A&M Retro

Well-Known Member
As most of you know, Herb Alpert, Jerry Moss, Karen Carpenter and Richard Carpenter got into a legal battle with Jack Daugherty after the label fired him. He sued them for demamation and damaage to his reputation, I believe.

The case finally went to court in 1981. The Carpenters and Herb and Jerry had to take the stand to indicate that Daugherty's contributions weren't much more than scheduling studio time, and pats on the back.

A&M won the suit, but Jerry Moss said it was a small victory after the hell they went through personally and financially to clear their name.

Richard said he was very moved when Daugherty showed up at Karen's funeral after all that had happened. He died in 1991.
 

RichardWarner

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Contributor
Always liked it. This was probably part of Jack Daugherty's contract with A&M for producing the Carpenters.

In high school we had a "stage band," which was a small ensemble — maybe 15 people — that played jazzier arrangements than the classical stuff played by the big concert band.

This album was what a stage band sounds like when you do it right. (As opposed to 11th graders performing.)
 

Mr Bill

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I grew up with a kid with this name (who claimed he was related to Jack) and he pronounced it DAH - er - tee...
 

Harry

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Reopening an old thread as I'm listening to the JACK DAUGHERTY AND THE CLASS OF 1971 album. A while ago I put the whole thing up on YouTube, and I find myself drawn to it more than once.


If you look through all of the old threads we've had on this album, you'll find my standard reply that I owned the album, but still hadn't listened to it. Once I did finally listen, I decided to digitize it for my collection, and find that some of these tracks are quite good, some in a very jazzy setting, some in an interesting instrumental way.

Others here don't like the vocals, but I find them quite good. With Ron Hicklin leading the vocalists, how could it be other wise? Checking with Discogs on this album, I find that I have a version not listed there. It's a white-label promo copy from Columbia Pitman. The label layouts and fonts look just like the stock pictures of the Columbia Pitman pressing.

If you have about 35 minutes to spare, give that YouTube a spin while your working or just listening at your computer.
The rear of the LP jacket:
DaughertyRearLP.jpg
 

Mike Blakesley

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I'm surprised Herb Alpert didn't play on this, given his love of jazz, although it came out about the time of his break from the music biz.

This is one of those albums that I tried to order out of the little "free full-color A&M catalog" that you could write for. (I wrote for one.) But, our record distributor never carried it.
 

Mr Bill

Gentlemanly Curmudgeon
Staff member
Moderator
It's one album I enjoy listening to once in a while. Even though we know Richard Carpenter was the driving force behind Carpenters' albums, Daugherty's hands-on producing of those albums decreased as Richard's skills increased) I often think of this as a "Carpenter-less Carpenters album."

For that reason the vocal numbers don't bother me at all. In fact, "Brothers and Sisters" should've been a hit IMHO, given the times in which it came out. Perhaps even appropriate today (lyrically, but likely not musically -- it does have that 70s jazz feel that many find anachronistic today but I love).

I also have a later LP by Daugherty whichm, while good, is not as good as this one. But that may be my A&M bias :wink:

--Mr Bill
 
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