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Kiss Me the Way You Did Last Night

JohnFB

Well-Known Member
...There are already enough attempts by members and fans to totally eliminate all backing instruments and just hear Karen singing a capella.

But as for the doubling, I'm afraid you and I will be agreeing to disagree. I love that sound and wouldn't want it diminished in any way.
No, I certainly wasn't lobbying for all a capella all the time, eliminating all backing vocals & instrumentation, and would never think of doing that - as a friend of mine used to say: "I may be crazy but I'm not stupid." Although now that you mention it an a capella album at some point might have been a very compelling (mind-blowing?) project...

We will continue to disagree amicably - I know why this seems so important to me, but I can't fully explain why I complain so vociferously - after all, Karen herself never objected (as far as we know) and appears to have been a willing and eager participant in all the recording sessions, and seemingly never disliked the double-tracked sound of her vocals. And in the end if there's any blame to be laid out (you would say credit) for this it's her's - she could have prevented it at any point simply by saying no and holding firm - she was the Superstar (the Diva) and they sure as hell weren't going very far without her cooperation...

I'll let this matter rest - for now...
 

JohnFB

Well-Known Member
This isn't something I've seen many fans take issue with, but the double-tracking is something that has bothered me on certain songs as its effect is often to dilute Karen's vocal and make it less direct and impactful.

I don't mind the doubling on 'Superstar' as it provides a change of pace from the verses, but I've never liked it on the chorus of 'I Won't Last a Day Without You' (hearing Karen sing the chorus as part of the 1976 medley highlights how much more effective a single vocal would have been on this song) and, as you say, the live versions of both 'A Kind of Hush' and 'I Need to Be in Love' are much improved shorn of the doubled vocals of the studio versions.

I'm really glad you mentioned Karen's double-tracking on "I Won't Last..." because more than just about any other song it's use here bothers me the most - this is such a really good song melodically and lyrically, and has such a great "feel" to it, and could easily have been one of their very best records - it's an excellent arrangement with tasteful instrumentation and backing vocals - Karen's vocals on the verses are wonderful, but as soon a the chorus begins that damn overdubbing starts and it's no longer Karen singing - it's now some unreal, manufactured, electronically created humanoid droning into the microphone - it's a total distortion of her naturally beautiful voice - it's strange how they only do this on 3 of the 4 lines of the chorus - the 4th line is sung without overdubbing, as if they have to quickly return to normal and get back to the real world - I love this song and her takes on the verses but have to force myself to grin and bear my way thru the choruses...it's a shame because of what could have been...
 

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
It would have been interesting to see them perform live with a female backup singer, preferably someone with more of an R&B sound. It could have provided an amazing contrast to Karen's lovely, clear, non-vibrato style.
 

Another Son

Well-Known Member
Of course, I was always aware of the double-tracking on the chorus of 'I Won't Last a Day Without You' but it has never bothered me that much. However, I do recognise that as soon as the recording returns to single-tracked Karen, her voice sounds a lot warmer and more present.
 

Another Son

Well-Known Member
Btw, to me, 'Kiss Me the Way You Did Last Night' sounds too similar to 'Touch Me When We're Dancing' to be on the 'Made In America' album. (I know that's been mentioned before). Interesting that the two songs sound so similar, because they're by different composers. I think it might be because Richard used a similar pattern in his arrangement on both songs - e.g. background vocals mirroring the lead melody line a couple of tones above / below in the chorus, the chorus really building up in that distinctive way from the verses, etc. etc. There are quite a few similar ideas and techniques in both arrangements.

I think maybe the song is a bit too syrupy - maybe a reason why Carpenters decided to leave it off their album and keep it in the can, originally.

Of the two songs, I think 'Touch Me When We're Dancing' came out better, so I think they made the right decision.

'Kiss Me The Way You Did Last Night' is OK, though - I'm glad it was released, and, at the time it came out, it was good to hear a pretty much finished track, with all the background vocals which, from memory, have a lot of Karen in them, rather than just Richard, like some of the other posthumous releases.
 

ars nova

Well-Known Member
'Kiss Me The Way You Did Last Night' is OK, though - I'm glad it was released, and, at the time it came out, it was good to hear a pretty much finished track, with all the background vocals which, from memory, have a lot of Karen in them, rather than just Richard, like some of the other posthumous releases.
[/QUOTE]

from what i remember, " kiss me " wasn't completed in time for MIA because of technical trouble during mixing,
 

ThaFunkyFakeTation

Ah am so steel een luv weeth yoo
I’m a big fan of Siedah Garrett both as a singer and songwriter and I agree, she was perfect for their sound.

She's a trained background singer on top of sounding great as a lead. She knows how to blend better than most. This was so up her alley.

[Love Me for What I Am] is the one I was referring to earlier in the thread when I mentioned that the doubling led to a phasing sound on her vocals. It wasn’t needed, is really distracting and spoils the song.

I agree that it wasn't needed but it doesn't ruin the tune for me. At least he didn't overproduce this tune. It got just what it needed. Plus, that final "so let me go". Goosebumps!

Ed
 

JohnFB

Well-Known Member
Of course, I was always aware of the double-tracking on the chorus of 'I Won't Last a Day Without You' but it has never bothered me that much. However, I do recognise that as soon as the recording returns to single-tracked Karen, her voice sounds a lot warmer and more present.
Exactly! But then again this was true on every other song where this grateingly artificial recording technique was used - so why not stick with "a lot warmer and more present" all the way through? For crying out loud, it's Karen's voice, which is about as warm and present as a human voice can get...then why f*** with it? (he says, hoping to not be admonished too severely...)
 

Jarred

Well-Known Member
Didnt
Btw, to me, 'Kiss Me the Way You Did Last Night' sounds too similar to 'Touch Me When We're Dancing' to be on the 'Made In America' album. (I know that's been mentioned before). Interesting that the two songs sound so similar, because they're by different composers. I think it might be because Richard used a similar pattern in his arrangement on both songs - e.g. background vocals mirroring the lead melody line a couple of tones above / below in the chorus, the chorus really building up in that distinctive way from the verses, etc. etc. There are quite a few similar ideas and techniques in both arrangements.

I think maybe the song is a bit too syrupy - maybe a reason why Carpenters decided to leave it off their album and keep it in the can, originally.

Of the two songs, I think 'Touch Me When We're Dancing' came out better, so I think they made the right decision.

'Kiss Me The Way You Did Last Night' is OK, though - I'm glad it was released, and, at the time it came out, it was good to hear a pretty much finished track, with all the background vocals which, from memory, have a lot of Karen in them, rather than just Richard, like some of the other posthumous releases.

I disagree, I think Kiss Me is a much better track that Touch Me (never even noticed the titles are similar) as it’s more imaginative, warmer and passionate and Karen sounds much better too. I do hear the structural parallels and even if Kiss Me is maybe a bit too busy it still makes more of an impact for me.
 
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