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Navy Presents or Sounds Like The Navy?

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
I was listening to both discs of this program over the past few days. Boy, compared to some radio programs that I have from the late 80’s (1987-1990) on LP, the sound quality is rough. A lot of the tracks seem to have been remixed to allow for playback on both mono stations and stereo. Maybe they were processed in the CSG process. But then again, Sam Riddle was probably using transcription discs or specially prepared LP’s, that were at least 1 analog generation away from the master tapes. Even “Ticket To Ride”, which is the 1969 version, sounds like the stereo version was reprocessed for this show so that it sounded ok on both mono and stereo stations. It doesn’t sound like he was using tape. Of course I think the one exception might’ve been “Flat Baroque” which was from ‘Your Navy Presents’.

I also found it interesting how, by 1971, they were still being Presented as Karen and Richard as the leads of the group, since there were a few Richard leads, like “Flat Baroque & I Kept On Loving You”.
 

Chris May

Resident 'Carpenterologist'
Staff member
Moderator
Most of the live recordings were taped in Studio C at A&M and mixed for the show.


My friend Alana Voeller's father produced the the program, so I can ask her to see what she remembers. I also acquired high-res scans of the master tapes and boxes from Richard. I'll check it out when I get home and see what other info I can find on this one.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
I wouldn't be surprised if the Carpenters and the Sam Riddle stuff was recorded at separate times in different studios. It just sounds so scripted - on both ends.

The quality of those record pressings was always variable. They were distributed to radio for a one-time only airing, usually on Sunday mornings.

I have a disc with Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 from a few years earlier. The whole disc is full of drop-outs, variable levels, - and the musical parts were taken from records - but only the right channel!

I'm pretty sure these were all made in mono in those early days. Stereo FM was still a sort-of newish thing, and AM was all mono, so it was likely that the programs were all mono.

If you listen to the "Get Together" track on FROM THE TOP or ESSENTIAL, it sounds to me as if Richard had that track "stereo-ized" with some reverb trails in one or both channels.
 

song4u

Well-Known Member
What was their obsession with Cinderella Rockafeller in the early days and does anyone know the story of how/why they came to include it in their early live shows?
Having seen the Australia concert on YouTube, I thought maybe it was an early attempt to get Karen out from behind the drums, and with Doug to help out, bringing her personality to the audience. Only idea I came up with. It was a novelty song and others were performing them in the 70s. But a single - ugh. Must be more to it.
 

Chris May

Resident 'Carpenterologist'
Staff member
Moderator
What was their obsession with Cinderella Rockafeller in the early days and does anyone know the story of how/why they came to include it in their early live shows?

The whole deal with Rockafella was that it was a trifle they'd thrown together in around 1970, along with Watermelon Man, Let it Be Me and Can't Buy Me Love.

They hit so fast around the time they played Tahoe as "Close to You" was becoming a smash — playing three sets per night, that they had to fill them up with material... quickly!

It wasn't meant to be serious. They just had to do what they had to do, which was a common theme for much of the material on the earlier albums as well, unfortunately.
 

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
The whole deal with Rockafella was that it was a trifle they'd thrown together in around 1970, along with Watermelon Man, Let it Be Me and Can't Buy Me Love.

They hit so fast around the time they played Tahoe as "Close to You" was becoming a smash — playing three sets per night, that they had to fill them up with material... quickly!

It wasn't meant to be serious. They just had to do what they had to do, which was a common theme for much of the material on the earlier albums as well, unfortunately.
"Let It Be Me" as in the Everly Brothers record?
 

Geographer

Well-Known Member
The whole deal with Rockafella was that it was a trifle they'd thrown together in around 1970, along with Watermelon Man, Let it Be Me and Can't Buy Me Love.

They hit so fast around the time they played Tahoe as "Close to You" was becoming a smash — playing three sets per night, that they had to fill them up with material... quickly!

It wasn't meant to be serious. They just had to do what they had to do, which was a common theme for much of the material on the earlier albums as well, unfortunately.

Oh great! Now the scavenger hunt is on for video/film and/or audio of Watermelon Man and Let It Be Me. I guess I have my marching orders for the next half-decade!
 

A&M Retro

Well-Known Member
The whole deal with Rockafella was that it was a trifle they'd thrown together in around 1970, along with Watermelon Man, Let it Be Me and Can't Buy Me Love.

They hit so fast around the time they played Tahoe as "Close to You" was becoming a smash — playing three sets per night, that they had to fill them up with material... quickly!

It wasn't meant to be serious. They just had to do what they had to do, which was a common theme for much of the material on the earlier albums as well, unfortunately.
Yikes! That’s big news indeed.
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't be surprised if the Carpenters and the Sam Riddle stuff was recorded at separate times in different studios. It just sounds so scripted - on both ends.

The quality of those record pressings was always variable. They were distributed to radio for a one-time only airing, usually on Sunday mornings.

I have a disc with Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 from a few years earlier. The whole disc is full of drop-outs, variable levels, - and the musical parts were taken from records - but only the right channel!

I'm pretty sure these were all made in mono in those early days. Stereo FM was still a sort-of newish thing, and AM was all mono, so it was likely that the programs were all mono.

If you listen to the "Get Together" track on FROM THE TOP or ESSENTIAL, it sounds to me as if Richard had that track "stereo-ized" with some reverb trails in one or both channels.
Both of my LP’s state “Compatible with Stereo” and there are clearly stereo effects, but not as much as on the original LP’s.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
That means that you can play the record with a stereo cartridge. The stereo you think you hear is just noise or added reverb.
 
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