The Dot Records Thread

Michael Hagerty

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Was waiting for someone to mention this. They had no less than Count Basie on that label and other jazz artists as you mentioned. To reduce Dot to the other nonsense is to miss a large part of Dot's legacy.

Ed

I think I was clear that the jazz is worthy of respect but didn't overall dilute the label's image.

Basie was one of the first signings the label made after Paramount bought it. He was there for two years (1967-69) and did an album of songs from a Paramount film (HALF A SIXPENCE), two albums with The Mills Brothers, one album with Kay Starr, one studio album and one live album.

Lalo Schifrin also came to the label through his work with Paramount (MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE).
 

Rudy

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I've read through a history of Dot Records, and it went through phases of music that it promoted. The "old fogie" music was a relic of one era, and that was partially ended when Welk bought the masters and released them on Ranwood. The label opened up to other types of music as the years passed (surf and other types of popular music of that era). When Paramount bought it, they eventually started using the Paramount name for the record label (Lalo Schifrin's Mission Impossible record was on Dot, where More Mission Impossible was on Paramount), then became ABC-Paramount when they were acquired. At some point in the mid 1970s the label deleted all of the catalog and instead, focused on country music.

The label never really entered my radar, so to me it has always been just another label, no image beyond it never being a major label.
 

Rudy

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And this is a bit humorous. I saw a listing for an estate sale starting tomorrow. The title of it included "LP records" so I had to check it out

The very first photo they posted?

1674591675220.png

Look on the left side of the row. 😁

Also, the bottoms of the spines from the next photo:

1674591973791.png

I haven't looked closer to see if I could read any of the other titles, but I'm getting the feeling these may not be the droids records I'm looking for. Mainly I'd want to see if they had any Horace Silver records, but from what little I can read of the spines, most of this is country & western, and folk music.
 

Moritat

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It is irteresting and a little sad that the square old fashioned stuff on the label is where Dot made all their money. The generation before us ate this stuff up and kept the label profitable. On the other hand, the fine jazz lps on Dot probably didn't make a cent and possibly were produced at a loss. So with the fortune they made with the bland uninteresting artists, they were able to afford to release some unprofitable albums that were creative artistic and original. It says something about the buying public and is also very ironic.
 

Rudy

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So with the fortune they made with the bland uninteresting artists, they were able to afford to release some unprofitable albums that were creative artistic and original.
I also get the impression that as the Paramount (after the Gulf & Western acquisition) corporate belt tightened, Dot put their entire back catalog out of print in favor of all the country artists. I really wonder how much that really helped their bottom line, as the label became defunct a few years later, absorbed into ABC-Paramount (which itself was later folded into MCA Records).
 

Moritat

Well-Known Member
I also get the impression that as the Paramount (after the Gulf & Western acquisition) corporate belt tightened, Dot put their entire back catalog out of print in favor of all the country artists. I really wonder how much that really helped their bottom line, as the label became defunct a few years later, absorbed into ABC-Paramount (which itself was later folded into MCA Records).
Yes, that country stuff was pathetic. Like a record company commiting suicide. Also, the sound on the Dot Paramount lps from 1968 and after was awful. The fidelity from the original label they used from 1958 thru the mid 60s was excellent, but I think Paramount started using subpar vinyl. The only Paramount Dot I ever liked was a fine lp by Ike Cole from 1969. By then, the labels best days were far behind them.
 
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