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David Sanborn's recent passing made me realize I had somehow zoned his work in putting together my Apple Music library. That's been solved and this morning's listen is his 1982 album As We Speak.

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I had owned it on vinyl back in the day, so this is like renewing an old friendship.
 
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David Sanborn's recent passing made me realized I had somehow zoned his work in putting together my Apple Music library. That's been solved and this morning's listen is his 1982 album As We Speak.
I did a brief tribute elsewhere, but it was a nice trip down memory lane to listen to a few of his records, and visit some of his earliest albums that I'd never heard.

I'd be hard pressed to choose only one favorite, but his albums from Another Hand and onward probably hold up the best for me. When he recorded Another Hand, this followed his final synth-funk-jazz album Close-Up (which was actually my entry point to his catalog). Another Hand changed it up to where he only wanted to use acoustic instruments from that point on and for the most part, he was able to do that.

The album is unusual in his catalog, and there's really only one track that could be considered a hit--a cover of NRBQ's "Hobbies," as Terry Adams had a hand in three or four tracks on the album. He still included a song by Marcus Miller (who produced his previous albums) but when an album features Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette and Bil Frisell, you know it's going to be unusual.

Is it my favorite? It might tie with the album that followed, Upfront. That one is a B3-driven, bluesy album that is driven by his band and a horn section, so it cooks.

Prior to these, Straight to the Heart might be my earlier favorite, as it's recorded live in the studio with a small audience, and the band is on it. Don Grolnick, Hiram Bullock, Buddy Williams, and Marcus Miller. And his gig with Bob James, Double Vision, is a good one from those years also.

I hadn't gotten much into his later recordings but I'm slowly correcting that as I work my way through his catalog.
 
David Sanborn's recent passing made me realized I had somehow zoned his work in putting together my Apple Music library. That's been solved and this morning's listen is his 1982 album As We Speak.

Unknown.jpeg



I had owned it on vinyl back in the day, so this is like renewing an old friendship.
I have this on CD along with many others by The late Great David sanborn weirdly enough I first heard the first side of this in 1985 being used as Sign on music over a TV test pattern I knew of Sanborn back then but was very new to the world of Jazz as I was 18 I searched endlessly for this until 1993 I finally heard a radio station play the Track "Better believe it" ( one of my favorites) which was one of the songs used on that test pattern and afterwards I bought the CD and I not only got that 4 song rotation but there was much more great music on it ( parts of my instrumental collections are full of similar examples of being used as media music until all the changes started happening) but my portion of Sanborn's discography ranges from his Debut "Taking off" up to "Hearsay" in 1993 I lost track afterwards but it's still wonderful music and it will live on forever.
 
Discovered quite a bit of new (to me) music playing in cafes in Italy. I had never heard of Jill Scott before. This morning, I'm listening to her 20-year-old album Beautifully Human: Words and Sounds, Vol. 2.

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It's 70s-flavored soul, but too vital to be dismissed as purely throwback. A really good album.
 
First of all, I just had to get this record. A classic blues album from 1962! John Lee Hooker's Burnin'. With the lead-off track, "Boom Boom," possibly the most popular track on the album. (The Animals covered it a few years later.) Fantastic mastering by Kevin "When Does He Sleep?" Gray once again, for Craft Recordings.

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And this one is for the "Who knew??" category. I played hte snot out of the CD when it was released in 2001. Jean-Luc Ponty just reissued it a few weeks ago, with revised cover art, and available on vinyl for the first time. I haven't checked the new CD mastering but the LP is a lot smoother sounding than the old CD version.

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I have another I picked up in mid-May and have been playing a lot, but will post it here once I can get pix of it.
 
First of all, I just had to get this record. A classic blues album from 1962! John Lee Hooker's Burnin'. With the lead-off track, "Boom Boom," possibly the most popular track on the album. (The Animals covered it a few years later.) Fantastic mastering by Kevin "When Does He Sleep?" Gray once again, for Craft Recordings.

1000009430.jpg


And this one is for the "Who knew??" category. I played hte snot out of the CD when it was released in 2001. Jean-Luc Ponty just reissued it a few weeks ago, with revised cover art, and available on vinyl for the first time. I haven't checked the new CD mastering but the LP is a lot smoother sounding than the old CD version.

1718332684505.png

1718332717596.png


I have another I picked up in mid-May and have been playing a lot, but will post it here once I can get pix of it.
That Vee Jay Label was perfectly reproduced I owned a couple of albums Victor Feldman's Love me with all your heart" and the interview album Capitol couldn't claim " Hear the Beatles tell all"
 
So, on Tuesday, I mentioned the tendency of a lot of Italian cafes to play Bossa Nova covers of pop hits. Where Soundhound could identify them, I popped the albums they were from into my Apple Music library just to see how they sounded at home.

Some were various artists compilations, but a couple called Mats & My showed up fairly often. No idea who they are, where they're from, but their 2019 and 2020 albums (recorded at home) have apparently crossed into the tens of millions of streams (I assume only some of those from Italy).

How left-field is some of this stuff? How about a Bossa Nova version of Maroon 5's 2010 hit "Moves Like Jagger"?



Listening to this album now, with the others lined up. Not at all sure that what works as a surprise in a strange environment does at home, but we'll see.
 
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Okay, so that album was...fine....but nothing I'm gonna keep.

On to the next one, and a perfect example of just how bonkers the song selections can get:

 
Interesting---in this second one, which is an EP, they cover an actual Bossa Nova song---Jobim's "O Morro Não Tem Vez"---with English lyrics by Ray Gilbert, re-titled as "Somewhere in the Hills", replacing the Portugese lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes.


 
Now into a series of Bossa Nova covers EP and albums by Rio Branco, which, again, I can't find much (any) information on.

Their covers are better-produced than Mats & My, and have some energy in them. The song choices, still bizarre on paper, actually work, in the way Brasil '66 covering The Beatles seemed odd, but sounded great:



 
I'll probably leave you guys alone after this, because I'm not sure I could top it....







(By the way, I just found the root of all these left-field bossa nova covers of rock. Turns out Seu Jorge did one of David Bowie's "Rebel Rebel" for the 2004 Wes Anderson film "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou". Seu appears in the movie, as well as the soundtrack.)
 
Having dispatched (most of) the Bossa Nova covers yesterday, this morning's listening begins with Botero, a 2009 collaboration between guitarist Jack Lee (who gets top billing) and Bob James.

Only three tracks in, it's very good. It does give me the vibe of "what if there were still smooth jazz radio stations?"...but I'm ready to hear that kind of music again.

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Having dispatched (most of) the Bossa Nova covers yesterday, this morning's listening begins with Botero, a 2009 collaboration between guitarist Jack Lee (who gets top billing) and Bob James.

Only three tracks in, it's very good. It does give me the vibe of "what if there were still smooth jazz radio stations?"...but I'm ready to hear that kind of music again.

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Thankfully I was able to collect a lot of that music they used to play on Smooth jazz radio ( long before they deviated and messed it up) and that's part of my musical format I use on my radio show which has been part of the foundation from day one at a time when smooth jazz and instrumental music on the radio in my area was completely disappearing this was the mid 90s.
 
And this one is currently playing. Ry Cooder and Manuel Galbán, Mambo Sinuendo. The more I've played it, the more it has grown on me. There isn't a bad track on this record. There's even a little nod to Perez Prado with a playful little cover of "Patricia." Cooder creates effective soundscapes behind the Latin-flavored music with his guitar, which works surprisingly well. Manuel Galbán is of course associated with the Buena Vista Social Club. And don't forget, Herbie and his trumpet have a guest spot on the title track. @Michael Hagerty I think this might be right up your alley. 👍

This is a three-sided pressing, with an etching on the fourth side which echoes the cover art. And the jacket itself is done in foil.

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Just played this ratty old copy my dad probably bought for two obvious reasons. 👀

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Sandy Warner "the Exotica Girl" no doubt helped sell a lot of Martin Denny albums however for me The Music has always been and still is the star of the show so to speak thankfully I was able to replace my ratty old Denny records with CD versions and that was not an easy task
 
Just played this ratty old copy my dad probably bought for two obvious reasons. 👀

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I've got six lines and every one of them is worse than the one before it.

Somewhere on this board is a thread about that cover model. I want to say it was a few years ago---pandemic, maybe?

(EDIT: I could have just changed this, but I want to show how faulty my memory can be):

It was only last August...ten months ago.






It just seems like years since I've seen those....(ahem).





Anyway, the thread begins with Rudy's post and we learn more about Ms. Warner from there:

 
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And this one is currently playing. Ry Cooder and Manuel Galbán, Mambo Sinuendo. The more I've played it, the more it has grown on me. There isn't a bad track on this record. There's even a little nod to Perez Prado with a playful little cover of "Patricia." Cooder creates effective soundscapes behind the Latin-flavored music with his guitar, which works surprisingly well. Manuel Galbán is of course associated with the Buena Vista Social Club. And don't forget, Herbie and his trumpet have a guest spot on the title track. @Michael Hagerty I think this might be right up your alley. 👍

This is a three-sided pressing, with an etching on the fourth side which echoes the cover art. And the jacket itself is done in foil.

1000009559.jpg

1000009557.jpg

It's in my library, Rudy. Ry is a remarkable artist. Not all his stuff appeals to me, but when it clicks, it clicks.
 
Somewhere on this board is a thread about that cover model. I want to say it was a few years ago---pandemic, maybe?
I do remember posting that someone on Discogs created a list of covers that Sandy Warner appeared on. In fact, I sent the person who created the list a link to George Shearing's Latin Escapade and he was pretty sure that was also Warner...and his wife verified it, "Yes, that's your girl!" 😁

It's in my library, Rudy. Ry is a remarkable artist. Not all his stuff appeals to me, but when it clicks, it clicks.
I agree--this is one he knocked out of the park. My attraction is that he is well aware of the history behind a lot of this music and knows how to complement it. Cooder was involved with the Buena Vista Social Club as producer.

I really don't know too much of his music though, so I may explore it at some point later in the year.
 
Grusin and Ritenour recorded Harlequin decades ago. Also a Brazilian theme, although more on the pop-oriented side. This will be interesting to compare.

And yes, thankfully, the strings stayed home. 🥳
 
Grusin and Ritenour recorded Harlequin decades ago. Also a Brazilian theme, although more on the pop-oriented side. This will be interesting to compare.

And yes, thankfully, the strings stayed home. 🥳
I have the Harlequin CD ( a replacement for the very worn vinyl version) the interesting thing about Harlequin is on the closing track "The Bird" ( one of my standout Favorites) the vinyl version is shorter and seems to be edited while the CD version has a longer version but to me Grusin and Ritenour were a great team I'm glad they did another one I will have to check their new one out and hear samples if it's as good or better I just may buy the album
 
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