• Don't forget to let us know which streaming services you use regularly. Vote in our poll here.

The Now Spinning/Recent Purchases Thread

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Moderator
While working on a music project, I reconnected with a long-forgotten song from 1970. It's one of those where I clearly remember all of the lyrics and the structure of the song, but haven't heard it in probably 20 years or so. And by playing it, it was like being reunited with an old friend.

The song is "I Can Remember" by Oliver. Yes, that Oliver, the one who did the gliddy gloop gloopy song, "Good Morning Starshine". This song came on his followup album OLIVER AGAIN, which I still own. I've been playing it over and over today.

It's on YouTube, but doesn't have too many views, so it's probably a truly forgotten song. It's chart history is that it made the Adult Contemporary Chart in the 20s somewhere, and that's it.

 

AM Matt

Well-Known Member
The Oliver song "I Can Remember" went to # 24 (Billboard's Adult Contemporary Chart) back in August of 1970. Matt Clark Sanford, MI
 

AM Matt

Well-Known Member
The Raspberries (with Eric Carmen) "I Can Remember" (from their self - titled 1972 debut album) (NOT the Oliver song) which runs 8 minutes!! Matt Clark Sanford, MI
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
One last record for the morning, while working on budgeting for the rest of the year. (Taxes weren't as brutal as I imagined.)

Al Jarreau, L Is For Lover. Great project that was produced by Nile Rodgers. One of his better offerings IMHO, which avoided the formulaic/generic R&B-jazz recipe many of his other albums had. I should find a sealed copy of this one, since this isn't the cleanest.
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
I watched this recently:


It's long, and somewhat tedious, but that is what this film is about. This isn't a live concert film, but a film about planning, scripting, preparing for and putting on a huge concert. It's incredible to see how much work goes on behind the scenes in these large productions, and I can see why artists and bands get tired of touring. It is a lot of work.
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
This is the original mix, not the 2007 remix (of all the Genesis albums) that smashed all the dynamics out of the music.

 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
I've been reviewing my collection of Library/production music I've previously mentioned Network music's Huge library of which I own several titles another one I got caught up on was the British international juggernaut known as KPM ( which stands for Keith Prouse & Peter Maurice Music) and their famous 1000 series which covers the period of the late 60s up to the 80s ( I stopped at 1977 ) and they have Many songs that were used in commercials and tv and A few game shows of the period ( even local tv stations had them not just the networks) you can get these albums on Amazon for download as well as the few Cd compilation sets issued by Dutton Vocalion and the happy peaceful memories keep on coming.
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
Something while I work my way through a Sunday evening...

 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
3200

So why does the "Allegro" part of "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta" remind me of a soundtrack for a Bugs Bunny/Elmer Fudd cartoon? :laugh: Especially the middle part, starting after the two minute mark. And the ending with "falling" strings and an air of finality. 😄


Fast forward to the 44:22 mark for the "Allegro" if the video does not start there.

Interesting tidbit--this SACD combines two RCA Living Stereo LPs. Concerto for Orchestra was the first LP, recorded in stereo in 1955 and released in 1956 on mono LP and stereo 2-track tape, with the Living Stereo LP version released in 1958. I picked up the Analogue Productions reissue of the stereo LP at the show a couple of weeks ago. The Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta/Hungarian Sketches performance was recorded in late December of 1958, and released on mono and stereo LP, and 4-track stereo tape, in 1960. (The early stereo tapes by RCA were all 2-track stereo, meaning, you did not have to flip the tape over to play the other "side" of the recording--the left and right channels filled the entire tape width, in other words.)

3201
 
Last edited:

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
"By pressing down a special key it plays a little melody." I like this way better than Autobahn which to me is too repetitive. This one was all over local radio when it was first released. And I still have my original LP. :)



And I'm not afraid of...



Interesting tidbit: Anne Dudley would go on to provide the orchestrations for both of ABC's The Lexicon of Love albums (which are decades apart). Trevor Horn would later produce albums for groups like Frankie Goes To Hollywood. And noted photographer Anton Corbijn created album covers for such artists as U2 and Depeche Mode (where he is also creative director), as well as directing and producing videos and directing film.
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
I’m a fan. Had to buy the red 3-D Box Set a couple of years ago. Already out of print.
I heard it sold quite well. :thumbsup: I admit I only have three Kraftwerk albums--Autobahn, Trans-Europe Express and Computer World (which our R&B/funk station latched onto and played heavily).
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin


I don't agree with some of the lukewarm reviews of this album--I would say it's one of my favorite Dire Straits albums, up there with Love Over Gold. Some say this one lacks energy, but that is possibly why I like it--it is low key. It has a few tracks I don't particularly care for, but I can say that about most albums out there.
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
I finally had a chance to get around to listening to this one today.



Fontella Bass makes an appearance on a couple of tracks here.

The track "Flite" is what caught my ear when it came up on Pandora--it samples the beginning of ECM artist Eberhard Weber's "Quiet Departures" from his album Fluid Rustle.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member


I don't agree with some of the lukewarm reviews of this album--I would say it's one of my favorite Dire Straits albums, up there with Love Over Gold. Some say this one lacks energy, but that is possibly why I like it--it is low key. It has a few tracks I don't particularly care for, but I can say that about most albums out there.
I love this song I think " On Every street " is one of my favorite Dire straits songs another one I haven't heard forever is an earlier one called " Industrial Disease" which shows a more Humorous side. In my opinion
 

Rudy

ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
Thread Starter
Staff member
Site Admin
I love this song I think " On Every street " is one of my favorite Dire straits songs another one I haven't heard forever is an earlier one called " Industrial Disease" which shows a more Humorous side. In my opinion
"Industrial Disease" is from Love Over Gold. That album only has five songs but every one of them is a winner. Apparently Knopfler got the idea for "Telegraph Road" while driving through our area on US-24 (aka Telegraph Rd.), headed to a concert, and built the whole song around the idea. I thought it would make a great backdrop for a video.

(I think I like US-24 a lot because first, it is an exit to our state 😁 and second, because it eventually ends up going through Colorado--one of our stops on the way home is in Manitou Springs, right off of US-24.)

"Private Investigations" is pretty cool, although is spooks a few people out. An interesting bit of trivia about "Industrial Disease": the term "brewer's droop" was a tongue in cheek reference to the name of an earlier band Knopfler belonged to for a few months in 1973.

I only place Brothers In Arms a bit lower since it got overplayed to death. And yeah, I admit I overplayed it also. It was the first CD to sell a million copies and it took me a couple of months to find it in stock since it was sold out everywhere. I pretty much like everything from "Ride Across The River" until the end, and the ones prior to it aren't bad. It's a shame "Money For Nothing" got killed by radio, then killed even more on classic rock radio by being repeated ad nauseum.
 

AM Matt

Well-Known Member
Former member of the original Little River Band, Beeb Birtles "Driven By Dreams" (either from 2000 or 2011) which I download from itunes & not available in stores & out of print. It is a great CD which is 45:10 in length. The song "In The City" which sounds like Herb Alpert or Chris Botti playing the trumpet BUT I went to the All Music website & I think that its a synthesizer that is playing. The song "Magnetic North" reminds me of Canadian singer Alannah Myles 1989 song "Black Velvet". Matt Clark Sanford, MI
 

AM Matt

Well-Known Member
I also downloaded The Bee Gees 1974 "Mr. Natural" which one of The Bee Gees thought that it was a great album that should have been. No one paid attention to that album. The title track & the song "Charade" was the only 45 singles that went downhill & a little radio airplay. Matt Clark Sanford, MI
 
Top Bottom