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Top Ten when Carpenters Peaked

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
That must be by far the highest 'Beechwood' charted anywhere in the world. I wonder what the difference was. Just the DJs prepared to play it on the radio, maybe.
It’s also interesting how another song the Carpenter’s covered, ‘Daddy’s Home’ was also on the same chart. Plus it’s weird seeing ‘How Great Thou Art’ on a Top 10 Pop chart!
 

Another Son

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
I just found this from New Zealand.

March 28, 1982

1 Hands Up (Give Me Your Heart) - Ottawan
2. Tainted Love - Soft Cell
3. Good Thing Going - Sugar Minott
4. Daddy's Home - Cliff Richard
5. I Can't Go For That (No Can Do) - Hall & Oates
6. Down Under - Men At Work
7. Centerfold - The J. Gells Band
8. Girls on Film - Duran Duran
9. How Great Thou Art - Sir Howard Morrison
10. Beechwood 4-5789 - Carpenters
I noticed some similarities between songs on this Top 10. Firstly, many were remakes of songs that were first recorded twenty or so years before and secondly, a number of the songs or artists had links to Motown.

'Hands Up' - a piece of Caribbean-French pop candy that sounds like Boney M;

'Tainted Love' - a different take on a 1964 song by Gloria Jones. (Some of Soft Cell's other earlier stuff was bizarre but interesting);

'Good Thing Going' - a remake of a Motown song, this time a reggae take on a song that Michael Jackson recorded on his 'Ben' album in 1972;

'Daddy's Home' - a song that Michael's brother Jermaine had a hit with on Motown, which was a remake of a 1961 song by Shep and the Limelites, (personally, I don't like Cliff Richard's version at all and like Richard Carpenter's version on 'Live in Japan' even less);

'I Can't Go for That' - a song with a cool bass line and keyboard riff, seemingly influenced by Motown, that I do like - and Hall and Oates later recorded with Motown artists David Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks;

'Down Under' - (I like a lot of Men at Work's songs, such as 'Who Can It Be Now', 'Johnny Be Good' and 'Overkill', but don't particularly like 'Down Under' - but it stinks that they got sued for having a tiny section of 'Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree' in the flute arrangement). I saw Men At Work in concert in about 1983 and loved it;

'Centrefold' - I don't like that song;

'Girls on Film' - a flimsy little song - I preferred 'My Own Way', from the same era;

'How Great Thou Art' - I know the hymn but don't know the recording. You could look at this recording as a remake - the hymn uses a traditional Swedish melody and a translation of a much later Swedish poem written in 1885 - no, I didn't know that until I looked it up;

'Beechwood 4-5789', another remake of a Motown classic, this time, a hit from 1962, written by Marvin Gaye, George Gordy and William Stevenson.

I visited New Zealand in 1990 and loved it. I remember that in Auckland, reggae and rap were especially big - you heard it everywhere. In Christchurch, you saw a lot of talented musicians playing on the streets. Seemed like a very musical place. The Irish influence was really evident music-wise and also obviously the Maori expression of music. Actually a huge number of musical acts successful in Australia over the years have come from New Zealand.
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
I noticed some similarities between songs on this Top 10. Firstly, many were remakes of songs that were first recorded twenty or so years before and secondly, a number of the songs or artists had links to Motown.

'Hands Up' - a piece of Caribbean-French pop candy that sounds like Boney M;

'Tainted Love' - a different take on a 1964 song by Gloria Jones. (Some of Soft Cell's other earlier stuff was bizarre but interesting);

'Good Thing Going' - a remake of a Motown song, this time a reggae take on a song that Michael Jackson recorded on his 'Ben' album in 1972;

'Daddy's Home' - a song that Michael's brother Jermaine had a hit with on Motown, which was a remake of a 1961 song by Shep and the Limelites, (personally, I don't like Cliff Richard's version at all and like Richard Carpenter's version on 'Live in Japan' even less);

'I Can't Go for That' - a song with a cool bass line and keyboard riff, seemingly influenced by Motown, that I do like - and Hall and Oates later recorded with Motown artists David Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks;

'Down Under' - (I like a lot of Men at Work's songs, such as 'Who Can It Be Now', 'Johnny Be Good' and 'Overkill', but don't particularly like 'Down Under' - but it stinks that they got sued for having a tiny section of 'Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree' in the flute arrangement). I saw Men At Work in concert in about 1983 and loved it;

'Centrefold' - I don't like that song;

'Girls on Film' - a flimsy little song - I preferred 'My Own Way', from the same era;

'How Great Thou Art' - I know the hymn but don't know the recording. You could look at this recording as a remake - the hymn uses a traditional Swedish melody and a translation of a much later Swedish poem written in 1885 - no, I didn't know that until I looked it up;

'Beechwood 4-5789', another remake of a Motown classic, this time, a hit from 1962, written by Marvin Gaye, George Gordy and William Stevenson.

I visited New Zealand in 1990 and loved it. I remember that in Auckland, reggae and rap were especially big - you heard it everywhere. In Christchurch, you saw a lot of talented musicians playing on the streets. Seemed like a very musical place. The Irish influence was really evident music-wise and also obviously the Maori expression of music. Actually a huge number of musical acts successful in Australia over the years have come from New Zealand.

Here’s “How Great Thou Art” that topped the charts. Morrison sings it in English and Maori, and at times it sounds operatic the way he sings it. And interesting Pop song!
 

Another Son

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
How very bizarre to see these two tunes sharing the top 10.
‘Tainted Love’ and ‘Beechwood’ are both mid-tempo and bouncy, though, so there are similarities.

I thought that was a bit of a theme with this Top 10. A lot of the songs were mid-tempo and jaunty. Lots of sunny stuff.
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
Australian Charts
Source: iTunes Charts for Australia
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