Why Not a Septet Plus One?

abstract_fan

Active Member
Thread Starter
Trading on the famous line, sextet plus one... When Mr. A finally formed a touring group Tijuana Brass, it didn't include a saxophone (not even the reformed TJB, or the Bullish era touring TJB had one).

Curious since he was coming off the Whipped Cream album which had almost half of the tracks with a saxophone.

Whipped Cream
Love Potion # 9
El Garbanzo
Butterball
Peanuts

Just wondering; lots more free time right now.
 

Captaindave

Well-Known Member
Herb also did not tour with the marimba which was heard on the studio recordings of many, many songs (until the 1974-1975 reorganized TJB group, and then Julius Wechter joined that group for concerts).

My opinion - strictly my opinion because I don't have any other facts to the contrary - is that the seven piece group was enough to cover the brass and rhythm aspects of the songs for the purpose of concert performances, and to the satisfaction of the audiences.

And, it gets more expensive to add more players if not absolutely necessary to present the music in concert to the satisfaction of the audience.

I heard the original Tijuana Brass in concert three times back in the 1960s. They were quite able to play any of the songs from any of the albums. If a supporting instrument that may have been included in the studio was missing, the audience didn't know the difference.

I think Herb Alpert probably decided that the seven piece group would be the Tijuana Brass, and that group was able to provide the concert sound that he wanted.
 
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abstract_fan

Active Member
Thread Starter
Good points Captain. Of course the group was the Brass. Only a few appearances of a reed instrument on the albums. A soprano sax makes its way on the Christmas album on Let It Snow; Marjorine has a clarinet on Warm; Moon River on Brass Are Comin', probably in the band on Carmen and Casino Royale, but only Whipped Cream had so much prominent sax work.
 

DAN BOLTON

Well-Known Member
Good points Captain. Of course the group was the Brass. Only a few appearances of a reed instrument on the albums. A soprano sax makes its way on the Christmas album on Let It Snow; Marjorine has a clarinet on Warm; Moon River on Brass Are Comin', probably in the band on Carmen and Casino Royale, but only Whipped Cream had so much prominent sax work.
Don't forget the bassoon on Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.

Also, one reason why Julius didn't tour with the Brass back in the'60's was because he was busy with the BMB.
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
The lack of a touring marimba is the one and only reason I'm glad I didn't see the Brass back in the day. I loved the marimba on the records (and still do) and I would have been severely disappointed walking into a concert and not seeing a marimba on the stage.

From seeing a few live videos, it appears that Lou Pagani did a lot of the marimba fills on the piano on stage.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
The lack of a touring marimba is the one and only reason I'm glad I didn't see the Brass back in the day. I loved the marimba on the records (and still do) and I would have been severely disappointed walking into a concert and not seeing a marimba on the stage.

From seeing a few live videos, it appears that Lou Pagani did a lot of the marimba fills on the piano on stage.
See. They were also great at Improvising ( which is what Expert Jazz Musicians by Nature do so well) so Herb Had all the Bases covered
 

abstract_fan

Active Member
Thread Starter
Went to bed too early last night, so I had more time to think ...sax on Mexican Corn, Mexican Drummer Man, Flamingo, South of the Border...but those we're all one offs. He really had saxophones on his mind for the Whipped Cream album.
 

abstract_fan

Active Member
Thread Starter
And now that I think of it, maybe that's why the sax solo in Bob Crewe's Music To Watch Girls By was so striking.
 
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