The Look Of Love As An Instrumental

rockdoctor

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
Lately on the station that I am listening to, there is an instrumental version of The Look Of Love being played. It is not the version from Burt Bacharach's Reach Out album.
This version is done very slowly with a muted trumpet. Does anyone know if there is such a version on the soundtrack or who might have done such a version?
 

lj

Well-Known Member
Could it be by Pat Williams, also known as Patrick Williams? Have a listen to this track from his fabulous 1968 album "Shades of Today." Williams is my favorite big band composer/arranger.

 

lj

Well-Known Member
Williams was heavily influenced by Brazilian music, Here is his exciting arrangement of "Laia Ladaia (Reza). from his Shades of Today album. I have a vinyl copy of the album and it's a prized part of my audio collection.

 

lj

Well-Known Member
What the heck, I like this album so much I thought I would post the entire album for everyone's listening pleasure. It had incredible variety. It also includes his terrific instrumental take on "For Me" and "Cinnamon and Clove". I would easily put this album in my Top 20. He arranged for the top vocalists like Sinatra, Jack Jones, and Steve & Eydie. And he wrote wonderful scores for TV and movies. He won an instrumental Grammy for his "Threshold" album. He passed away in 2018.

 

Michael Hagerty

Well-Known Member
Contributor
What the heck, I like this album so much I thought I would post the entire album for everyone's listening pleasure. It had incredible variety. It also includes his terrific instrumental take on "For Me" and "Cinnamon and Clove". I would easily put this album in my Top 20. He arranged for the top vocalists like Sinatra, Jack Jones, and Steve & Eydie. And he wrote wonderful scores for TV and movies. He won an instrumental Grammy for his "Threshold" album. He passed away in 2018.

Pat’s sixties albums got play on KMPC in Los Angeles, so I was already familiar with his work when The Bob Newhart Show came along.
 
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rockdoctor

Well-Known Member
Thread Starter
Could it be by Pat Williams, also known as Patrick Williams? Have a listen to this track from his fabulous 1968 album "Shades of Today." Williams is my favorite big band composer/arranger.

This was not the version that I heard. There was too much brass in it. What I heard was a very muted trumpet done with a very slow tempo and no loud parts as in this version posted. Thanks for the information though.
 

Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
Site Admin
It's been covered so many times that it would be difficult to pinpoint exactly who did it. Doing a title search in my Roon Player, I show 619 recordings of it (combining music in my own library plus versions found on Qobuz). I've been scrolling through it but nothing has jumped out at me yet. I think I can also play all these versions with one click, although that could take a while. 😁

It's not on the original soundtrack--most of the reprise versions there are with the orchestra.

I see that smooth jazz trumpeter Chris Botti has recorded it, but I don't know if he uses a mute or not (I've never listened to his recordings).
 

GDBY2LV

Well-Known Member
Try the Herb Alpert version from his Colors album. The first part is muted anyway. You can sample it on iTunes. Just a guess.
 

lj

Well-Known Member
Pat’s sixties albums got play on KMPC in Los Angeles, so I was already familiar with his work when The Bob Newhart Show came along.
I also remember Pat's music on KMPC, typically before the hour or half hour news. I enjoyed listened to KMPC Los Angeles, which had a strong daytime signal to reach San Diego. It was owned by the singing TV/Movie cowboy Gene Autry (remember Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer), which played a lot of good easy listening music. Nighttime DJ Johnny Magnus said the station gave the DJ's freedom to play the MOR music that they liked. And this attracted the likes of the legendary arranger Billy May to tune in at night. In my opinion, a big problem was they didn't play enough music due to the constant sports barrage of broadcasts of the Rams, Angels and UCLA teams. KMPC's MOR rival was the mighty 50,000 wat clear channel station KFI. But it too constantly preempted the music with Dodger's baseball. However, I liked to listen to the games just to hear the incredible voice and play-by-play from the legendary sports announcer Vin Scully. Also, I never enjoyed both stations constant DJ chit chat--but that's how it was in the '60s on AM radio. And, so by 1970, KBIG Catalina became my favorite radio station. There was no DJ chit chat, no sports interruptions, just tons of good MOR music with the A&M artists featured prominently. This non-stop music attraction became sort of a prototype of what FM radio stations would become in the '70s.
 
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