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COME FLY WITH ME - Reviews & Comments

What Are Your Favorite Tracks? (multiple choices available)


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Bobberman

Well-Known Member
Herb is still "ON A ROLL" with his latest offerings. I especially like his take on The Beatles " Something". And his remake of "I've Got A Lot of Living To Do". The whole Cd Is "Excellent".
 

DeeInKY

Well-Known Member
Does everyone over there have a couple of belts before they start writing or something? :confused: Copy editing is a dying art. It's sad.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
Does everyone over there have a couple of belts before they start writing or something? :confused: Copy editing is a dying art. It's sad.
It makes you wonder doesn't it? And as another example some discography listings on Herb Alpert's albums still wrongly list his Greatest Hits volume 2 as being released in 1973 when it was really was released in 1977. I kind of wonder "What are They Thinking?".
 

Mike Blakesley

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Staff member
Moderator
The magic word is "database." All it takes is one person sitting at one keyboard to make one typo, and that error will live on and be picked up by other databases, websites, catalogs, etc. etc. only to be regurgitated from time to time by various outlets.

I can see where Randy might be mistaken for a son, what with the same last name and all.
 

Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
Site Admin
Does everyone over there have a couple of belts before they start writing or something? :confused: Copy editing is a dying art. It's sad.
When I now see this in major news outlets (local newspapers, CNN, etc.), it does make me wonder. It's either that or they don't bother having anyone on staff to proofread (which saves money). Sometimes there are entire words that are wrong.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
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Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
We have an item at the store with the word UTILITY on it, spelled UTILTIY. I forget what the item itself is.

This isn't altogether new though... I remember a trailer for the movie "An American President" which had Richard Dreyfuss' last name spelled as "Dreyfus." I think we all just see more examples of it now thanks to the internet.
 

DeeInKY

Well-Known Member
Sad. I work for a media company. A couple of our own horrible examples: mixing up Upton Sinclair and Sinclair Lewis and referring to God's Pantry, a local food bank, as "God's Panty." Oh, the phone calls. :rolleyes:
 

Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
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"Panty?" :laugh:

On another forum, we used to joke about a fellow member who was a bit spelling and grammar challenged...she was "A reel tail of whoa." :D
 

toeknee4bz

Well-Known Member
On a totally trivial topic: Herb once told an amusing story of how A&M began, and how the first single was A&M 701. He asked Jerry, "Why 701? Why not just #1, or 101?" He said Jerry's reply was "We want everybody to think we've already had 700 records out."
Fast forward 50+ years: With the new label Herb Alpert Presents, I suppose Herb finally got his 'keep it simple' way with album numbering. My copy of Come Fly With Me is numbered HRB 001.
 

Mike Blakesley

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Staff member
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Herb talks about Jerry's brilliant idea on one of the many interviews that have come out in the past few years. In that interview he says that the first single number was "101" but most of the Lonely Bull examples I've seen say 703, with the text "A&M 1005" there too. Maybe Harry can shed some light on that. I think we've discussed this before in fact.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
The first album number was LP 101; the first single ("The Lonely Bull") was 703 with a matrix number of 1005. It's b-side was matrix number 1006.

Yeah, the story I always heard was that Jerry didn't want to be promoting a new song, new artist, new label. He wanted to make it sound as if this was all well-established - and not something out of someone's garage! :D

Harry
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
The first album number was LP 101; the first single ("The Lonely Bull") was 703 with a matrix number of 1005. It's b-side was matrix number 1006.

Yeah, the story I always heard was that Jerry didn't want to be promoting a new song, new artist, new label. He wanted to make it sound as if this was all well-established - and not something out of someone's garage! :D

Harry
Great strategy i think. And understandable too.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
Here's a video I posted on YouTube some time back when Herb was on "Video Soul" in 1989, right before the sale of A&M that talks about Jerry's strategy:

I seen this video on youtube 4 years ago for the first time and i have rewatched it several times since then i love watching it. Thanks for sharing this Captain.
 

toeknee4bz

Well-Known Member
It makes you wonder doesn't it? And as another example some discography listings on Herb Alpert's albums still wrongly list his Greatest Hits volume 2 as being released in 1973 when it was really was released in 1977. I kind of wonder "What are They Thinking?".
The likely reason for this is because the only song on that compilation which had a copyright or patent date was "Last Tango In Paris", marked with a tiny asterisk. And the asterisk was listed below with 1973 as a date. People invariably mistook this as the date of the Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 release, and there you have it. Some later releases have the 1977 date on them. But the damage was already done.
 

Bobberman

Well-Known Member
The likely reason for this is because the only song on that compilation which had a copyright or patent date was "Last Tango In Paris", marked with a tiny asterisk. And the asterisk was listed below with 1973 as a date. People invariably mistook this as the date of the Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 release, and there you have it. Some later releases have the 1977 date on them. But the damage was already done.
True That. And i think considering that the vinyl version was originally only availiable through record clubs until at least 1980 with the the 1977 date and other similar situations. IMO possibly kept this from selling as well as the first Greatest hits lp which sold much more in its first run.
 
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