Classic AOTW HERB ALPERT PRESENTS Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 SP-4116

What is your favorite track?

  • Mas Que Nada

    Votes: 6 33.3%
  • One Note Samba/Spanish Flea

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • The Joker

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • Going Out Of My Head

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • Tim Dom Dom

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Daytripper

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • Agua De Beber

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • Slow Hot Wind

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • O Pato

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Berimbau

    Votes: 2 11.1%

  • Total voters
    18

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66
HERB ALPERT PRESENTS SERGIO MENDES & BRASIL '66

A&M SP-4116



Released as mono LP 116 and as Verve CD B0007428-02 along with numerous releases in Japan including POCM-1879.

Also released as an audiophile MSFL LP.



Tracks:

Side One
1 Mas Que Nada (Jorge Ben) 2:37
2 One Note Samba/Spanish Flea (Jobim-Mendonca/Wechter) 1:46
3 The Joker (Newley-Bricusse) 2:37
4 Going Out Of My Head (Randazzo-Weinstein) 3:00
5 Tim Dom Dom (Joao Mello-Coda) 1:51

Side Two
1 Daytripper (Lennon-McCartney) 3:09
2 Agua De Beber (Jobim-de Moraes-Gimbel) 2:28
3 Slow Hot Wind (Mancini-Gimbel) 2:32
4 O Pato (Silva-Teixeira) 1:58
5 Berimbau (Powell-Gilbert-de Moraes) 3:15

PRODUCED BY: HERB ALPERT
ARRANGED BY: SERGIO MENDES
ENGINEERED BY: BRUCE BOTNICK, SUNSET SOUND
ALBUM DESIGNED BY: PETER WHORF GRAPHICS

Liner notes:

It's good that Brasil '66 has succeeded, because it confirms one's belief that, musically, these are fluid times, with more openings than ever before for contemporary creative endeavor. I cannot see how substantial international achievement can elude this group who have marketed, with considerable taste, a delicately-mixed blend of pianistic jazz, subtle Latin nuances, Lennon-McCartneyisms, some Mancini, here and there a touch of Bacharach, cool, minor chords, danceable up-beat, gentle laughter and a little sex.

As I say, if the market will support this unabashed form of pop hybrid, then light music has indeed grown up and become very strong and healthy.

To put you in the picture — as Beryl Blood once said in a rare flash of wit — Brasil '66 is the name applied with astute euphonic accuracy to the four-man, two-girl entertainment unit which was consciously created, deliberately disciplined, and beyond doubt was bound to become beautiful and famous and rich and all of the things for which mortals have, since two wood clubs and a monkey-skin bought one stone axehead, been engaged in a ceaseless, relentless quest. The 'Brasil' of the title was selected because the group was established in Ipanema and '66, as you've guessed, is the year of the unit's creation.

The story of Brasil '66 actually began a few years ago, in Ipanema when Sergio Mendes, a conspicuous and talented young pianist on the Bossa Nova scene, had formed a quintet and as his travels in North America increased, he began to dig the new, healthy U.S./Latin musical fusion of Getz and he was sufficiently motivated by musical instincts and money to set about making danceable, hummable, singable, melodic jazz-Brazil-pop go to work for him.

At the end of 1964, he left Brazil and with a young New York lawyer named Richard Adler as manager, he set up the group which became known as Brasil '65. Through personnel changes and tireless experimentation, he arrived at what he now believes to be the ideal combination of vocal and instrumental power, without bias in either direction.

By spring of 1966 they were ready for much work. Adler and Mendes diffidently asked A&M to look them over and the record company's enthusiasm was boundless. Herb Alpert took them on tour with him and though Alpert's generous personal and publicized approval of Brasil '66 has been of incalculable value to the group, it emerged that Brasil '66 were certain, clear and critically-appraised artists in their own separate right. A Memphis journalist wrote: "Look for this group to climb from under Alpert's shadow into a spotlight all their own."

As I never try to better quotes from Memphis journalists, here, abruptly, is where the liner notes end.

Derek Taylor

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Among the many pleasure in the record business is the reward of finding new and exciting talent.

One afternoon recently, a friend of mine called to ask if I wanted to hear a new group. From the first note I was grinning like a kid who'd just found a new toy. The group is headed by an amazingly talented piano playing arranger...Sergio Mendes.

Since that time, Sergio and I have become good friends. I know you'll enjoy them as much as I do. It is with pride that I present Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66.

Herb Alpert
 

seashorepiano

Active Member
Not sure where to start with this. I understand that this is a legendary album, but for me, it's the least favorite of the three "early" albums. Equinox is my favorite. The songs are all great, and the musicianship is good, but it's just never engaged me or excited me musically the way the next recording did. Four stars from me.
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
I agree with Seashore that the next two albums are both better than this one. This is because (in my opinion at least) this album is much more uneven than the next two.

That said, this album is full of great tracks. Only three songs are less than stellar in my book: "One Note Samba/Spanish Flea," "Tim Dom Dom" and "O Pato." The rest would make any "best of Sergio" compilation I'd ever assemble. Just great stuff.

It would be very hard to pick a favorite song from the other seven tunes. I'll have to give this some thought. I can say my top three: "Mais Que Nada," "Going Out of My Head," and "Berimbau." OK, four: "Agua De Beber" has to be on the list too.
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
A very humble but also enthusiastic start for the discovery of this Brazilian group and the new and up-coming Bossa-Nova sound... I agree this album can be uneven at times but never without direction or a sense of purpose... (Anyway, why is it so short???)

The more advanced efforts of their future works surpass this debut greatly, but there are songs with fire & power like "Mas Que Nada" and tranquil moments such as "Slow, Hot Wind" and stuff like "Agua De Beber" which generally falls in-between...

An average but very promising and in a great way, notable effort...



Dave
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Wow. I can't believe the somewhat tepid response so far.

This album is an absolute, knock-it-out-of-the-park, home run. Short, sweet, to-the-point with no fat or waste. Every second of its 26 or so minutes is part of an incredible sonic journey.

We know now that this album featured only Lani Hall on lead vocals, often double-tracked, but always heavenly. Janis Hansen had yet to join the group and Bibi Vogel is pictured on the cover - neither participated in the recording.

I picked the lead track, incorrectly spelled on the cover and label, "Mas Que Nada" as favorite, though really, the album as a whole is a unified favorite. But "Mas Que Nada" is a killer track that still serves its knockout punch today, 42 years later.

Harry
...without enough superlatives to describe this album, online...
 

audiofile

Member
I too find it hard to believe the response of this album so far. This is a great album. Not their best, but a damn good album.

The Joker is a great track, even though every song is worth repeated listens.
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
Well, tepid is definitely the best word to that I would use describe this, and that's with the ten-or-more years I have been into Sergio Mendes...

This "first-out" does break some amazing ground and some of the best treatments that the songs of Anthony Newley and Baden Powell have seen, on "The Joker" and "Berimbau", respectively...

Likewise, with the newer albums came a more "fullness" in sound, "advancement" in arrangements and just a bit "bigger" on material... Here it sounds kind'a "under-developed"...

Not saying this or any of the early Sergio Mendes works aren't any good, just that I've preferred the middle-to-later period somewhat better...

Although in summary, the early years served well as a "launching pad" for Lani Hall, as in the next decade a solo career awaited for her, as well as a few other surprises...



Dave

--And glad that there is FINALLY Discussion & Activity going on in the Sergio Mendes/Brasilian Music Forum...!:cool:
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
I have to say the thing I find "less than great" about those 3 tunes is the tunes themselves....about the band and the vocals, I have no complaints at all. Stellar all the way.
 

Murray

Well-Known Member
This album may not top my list of favourite Brasil '66 albums, but it's still a fantastic album, and I'd rank it only behind Equinox and Fool On The Hill!

My favourite song on the album is "Mas Que Nada". In my opinion, this is THE definitive Brasil '66 track... I can't understand a word of it, and yet I still love it!! :laugh:
 

Captain Bacardi

Well-Known Member
Moderator
For the longest time - especially before I came aboard the Corner some 11 years ago - I had always had a ho-hum view of Brasil '66, mainly because the only tunes I had heard were the pop remakes ("Going Out Of My Head", "Daytripper", "Fool On The Hill", etc.). I finally ran across the MFSL vinyl of this album at a record show, and thought "what the heck, give it a try". This album really blew me away because of the more authentic Brazilian songs. My favorite tune is "Agua De Beber", mainly because of the killer trombone solo! (I hope Steve has the session musicians available on this one so we can see who the 'bone player is.) Another fave is "O Pato" as well as "Berimbau". I've kind of gotten tired of "Mas Que Nada" although it's still a solid track. This is a more bare-bones recording which adds to the appeal for me. A definite winner!



Capt. Bacardi
 

A&Mguyfromwayback

Active Member
Industry Member
This is the album that got me hooked on Sergio MANY years ago....yes, it's extremely short, but if it doesn't go all the different places later releases did, this is where it all began - vibey, musical, fun, very Brazilian, and truly Sergio from start to finish. Indispensable.
 

Moritat

Active Member
I hate to vote for the front runner, but MAS QUE NADA is my favorite track. This is a great lp, but not as good as EQUINOX & FOOL ON THE HILL.

There's about 5 or 6 other great tunes on this lp, and that includes the cool & mellow SLOW HOT WIND, which is a Mancini tune originally titled LUJON.
 

Steve Sidoruk

Founder, A&M Fan Net
Staff member
Moderator

A&M 807 Mas Que Nada b/w The Joker


A&M 8519 Forget Me Nots re-issue 45 Mas Que Nada b/w Constant Rain (Chove Chuva)


A&M Japan CD D20Y4014


Japanese CD release - lyric sheet


Japanese Open Reel Tape - back cover

Recording Session Info:

5/19/1966 - Gold Star Recording Studios - The Joker - Mais Que Nada - Sergio Mendes - piano, Robert Matthews - bass, Jose de Azerei Soares - percussion, Howard Perry - ?

6/8/1966 - Sunset Sound - One Note Samba/Spanish Flea, O Pato - Sergio Mendes - piano, Robert Matthews - bass, Jose de Azerei Soares - percussion.

6/12/1966 - Sunset Sound - Daytripper, One Note Samba, Benning Bour - Sergio Mendes - piano, Robert Matthews - bass, Jose de Azerei Soares - percussion.

Notes:
Obviously, this info is incomplete - we're missing musicians and tracks. I guess that last title may be someone's feeble attempt at "BERIMBAU."
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Here's the back cover of a relatively recent Brazilian vinyl pressing on ELENCO. It's a mono version of the album, but I think it's just a fold-down of the stereo. Note the misspelling of Peter Whorf's name.



Harry
 

DAN BOLTON

Well-Known Member
Poor guy! I'll bet that probably happened to him a lot over the years, as easy as it is to confuse an F with an E if you don't look too closely at what you're reading.

Even more embarrassing was an auto dealer's ad for the then-new Isuzu Ascender...you can probably guess what the copywriter called it...



Dan
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Not quite as many hilarious mis-quotes of the lyrics on that Japanese sheet as there are on some of the other albums' sheets!
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
Mike Blakesley said:
Not quite as many hilarious mis-quotes of the lyrics on that Japanese sheet as there are on some of the other albums' sheets!
Just reading through some of those lyrics, it appears that I've misinterpreted the lyrics to "The Joker" for a lot of years.

I've always heard "...The poor nothing fool falls on his back..." and now I see that Lani is singing, "...The poor laughing fool falls on his back..."

Oh well. It took almost as long for me to get "fate deals a hand" in the same song.

:laugh:

Harry
 

afcorsel

New Member
OK... I get hung up on this album, mainly because we were sold a false set of goods. Supposedly it has Janis Hansen and Lani Hall listed as singers. But I've been led to understand that the album only has Lani double tracking. Plus that is not Janis Hansen on the cover. I don't like being deceived like this, and Sergio did that to me often, with future albums. Is Karen Philipp really singing on the "Fool on the Hill" LP?? or is it only Lani??

Since I liked Brasil '66 for its vocals, I often was not sure who was singing when, despite what the album notes said.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
afcorsel said:
OK... I get hung up on this album, mainly because we were sold a false set of goods. Supposedly it has Janis Hansen and Lani Hall listed as singers. But I've been led to understand that the album only has Lani double tracking. Plus that is not Janis Hansen on the cover. I don't like being deceived like this, and Sergio did that to me often, with future albums. Is Karen Philipp really singing on the "Fool on the Hill" LP?? or is it only Lani??

Since I liked Brasil '66 for its vocals, I often was not sure who was singing when, despite what the album notes said.
I think it was a product of the time. Back in the '60s, there were lots of albums that "advertised" a group of people, when in fact, lots of other people actually did the recordings.

At least Sergio got "most" of his people right on the covers. This album was likely a victim of timing. They'd hired and fired Bibi Vogel who managed to get into the cover picture, recorded the album with only Lani Hall, and then hired Janis Hansen after the album was done.

But the main unit of the band is intact, pictured on the cover. As for the liner notes or credits - no-one other than Sergio is mentioned!

Harry
 

afcorsel

New Member
Yes...you are correct about the 1st A&M album. It is on 'Equinox' that both singer's names are stated. I'm not even sure if 'Equinox' HAS Janis. Often in those days they would record enough for two albums. Janis comes into her own on 'Look Around' and Karen on "Ye-Me-Le". I always thought Lani was over rated and got special treatment because of her relationship with Herb Alpert.
If you listen to Karen on "So Many People" she and Lani sound very much alike. And for many years I thought it was Lani on "Look of Love" when in fact it was Janis.

My point is all these other singers were just as good and just as sexy sounding.
Yet Lani is the one spotlighted on most of their recordings. Why have two girls
if you are only using one? Plus Karen's stage presence was outstanding!
 

Mr Bill

Gentlemanly Curmudgeon
Staff member
Moderator
afcorsel said:
I always thought Lani was over rated and got special treatment because of her relationship with Herb Alpert.
That's a bit harsh!

While that may have been true during her solo period*, it certainly wasn't true in the B66 days. After all, Herb and Lani didn't become an "item" until the late 60s (at the earliest)... Even Sergio has said Lani's departure from B66 was partly due to "Herb stealing my girl" away... and Lani was still in the band up to Ye-Me-Le (and even long enough to make the cover shot for Stillness in 1970).

--Mr Bill
*Snarky record people would often say, "her records don't sell -- she only gets to keep making them because she's married to the owner of the label."
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Karen on "Ye-Me-Le".
???

I was always under the impression that Karen didn't sing a lead vocal until STILLNESS (on "For What It's Worth").

As far as things 'not being what they seem,' consider the song "Righteous Life" (also from STILLNESS). The only person from the band performing on that song is Lani -- even Sergio sits it out.
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
I forgot how deeply heartfelt I am over "Going Out Of My Head", especially in the Brasilian manner these guy 'n' gals have done it...!

Wasn't Little Anthony & The Imperials the first group that recorded it? I love the way The Lettermen did it as a medley with "Can't Take My Eyes Off You"... And I know Nancy Wilson also recorded it, and made it the last song of the album she did it on, as well...

But for now, my rediscovery of Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 interpretation of this Terry Randazzo/Bobby Weinstein-written classic kind'a smokes the other versions :bandit:

And a runner-up for this occasion, is the medley of "One Note Samba"/"Spanish Flea"; kind'a neat how those two numbers really go together, sung-out like they are...!



Dave:cool:
 

A&Mguyfromwayback

Active Member
Industry Member
It's a phenomenal album - their sound was established out of the gate, and everything that happened later came out of this release....but, to be fair, it would be easy to feel a little nonplussed at an album that's TWENTY MINUTES LONG! (Leave for a bathroom break and when you come back the album's over.) I know many of these LPs were this length, but when your version of "Berimbau" feels like "Hey Jude" because it's 3:15.......:)
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Thread Starter
Staff member
Moderator
A&Mguyfromwayback said:
... it would be easy to feel a little nonplussed at an album that's TWENTY MINUTES LONG!
It actually clocks in at something over 25:13, depending on the gap times.

But we get your point!

Harry
 
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