🎵 Classic AOTW Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 - FOOL ON THE HILL SP-4160

What is your favorite track?

  • Fool On The Hill

    Votes: 5 17.9%
  • Festa

    Votes: 4 14.3%
  • Casa Forte

    Votes: 3 10.7%
  • Canto Triste

    Votes: 2 7.1%
  • Upa, Neguinho

    Votes: 2 7.1%
  • Lapinha

    Votes: 3 10.7%
  • Scarborough Fair

    Votes: 3 10.7%
  • When Summer Turns To Snow

    Votes: 1 3.6%
  • Laia Ladaia (Reza)

    Votes: 5 17.9%

  • Total voters
    28

Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
Site Admin
Here is another question. What other A&M albums, if any, had HAECO-CSG and does anyone know what it stands for?
I have looked at some of my A&M records and do not see it. I thought that since the Brasil'66 Greatest Hits had ti that the TJB Greatest would as well but it does not state it. The closest catalog number to Fool On The Hill that I have is Claudine Longet Colours and it does not have it.
In a nutshell, CSG (compatible stereo generator) adds a 90° phase shift to only one channel of a stereo recording.

The plus side is that if you play the stereo record over a mono system, the level of the center signal (consider a lead instrument or singer centered between the two speakers) will be dropped in level so it does not play back too loudly, due to the electrical summing of both sides.

The minus side is that it sounds weird and "phasey" when played in stereo, and smears where the instruments are placed left to right in the soundstage. (For instance, you might hear the fundamental note of a bass in one place, and the overtones (the "plucking") in another. It's not as bad as a stereo signal being completely out of phase (which over headphones, feels as though your eardrums are getting sucked out of your head), but it's enough to ruin the enjoyment of an album.

The only software I've found with a phase shift feature is made by Izotope, so thankfully I mostly corrected my copies of these albums after I ripped them for the music server.
 

rockdoctor

Well-Known Member
In a nutshell, CSG (compatible stereo generator) adds a 90° phase shift to only one channel of a stereo recording.

The plus side is that if you play the stereo record over a mono system, the level of the center signal (consider a lead instrument or singer centered between the two speakers) will be dropped in level so it does not play back too loudly, due to the electrical summing of both sides.

The minus side is that it sounds weird and "phasey" when played in stereo, and smears where the instruments are placed left to right in the soundstage. (For instance, you might hear the fundamental note of a bass in one place, and the overtones (the "plucking") in another. It's not as bad as a stereo signal being completely out of phase (which over headphones, feels as though your eardrums are getting sucked out of your head), but it's enough to ruin the enjoyment of an album.

The only software I've found with a phase shift feature is made by Izotope, so thankfully I mostly corrected my copies of these albums after I ripped them for the music server.
Apparently it is a sound that I do not notice. Thanks for the information.
 

Rudy

¡Que siga la fiesta!
Staff member
Site Admin
Apparently it is a sound that I do not notice. Thanks for the information.
It's easier to demonstrate if you can hear a before and after comparison. I tend to notice it more when I'm using the system at my computer, since the speakers are closer to me.
 

Harry

Charter A&M Corner Member
Staff member
Site Admin
Thread Starter
And it's a dead giveaway on headphones.
 
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