Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 Line-Up Changes

JOv2

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I'm not sure I see sandwiches...don't know what's on the plate.
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Harry

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Much of this was discussed back in 2007 when Brasil '66 got a release in the 20th Century Masters Millennium Collection:


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lj

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Harry--Thanks for posting Sergio's family pictures. His first wife Marci was very attractive.

Regarding the Coors beer cans shown above--here is some beer trivia. In California in the 1960s, two beer brands were dominant--they were Coors Banquet and Olympia. However, beer sales in California would dramatically change in the 1970s. In 1969, Philip Morris (the cigarette company) bought out Miller Brewing Company and in the 70s Miller High Life would soar in sales and popularity along with the introduction of Miller Lite. Also Anheuser Busch in the 70s soared past Coors and Olympia with Budweiser and later Bud Light leading the way. In later decades, what saved Coors was the introduction of its Coors Light. As for Olympia, as of 2021, production of its brand had ceased. For me, Miller High Life is my go-to beer. It has an incredible creamy foam and interestingly I've read on the internet that for craft brewers and bartenders their go-to legacy brand is also Miller High Life.
 

Michael Hagerty

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Harry--Thanks for posting Sergio's family pictures. His first wife Marci was very attractive.

Regarding the Coors beer cans shown above--here is some beer trivia. In California in the 1960s, two beer brands were dominant--they were Coors Banquet and Olympia. However, beer sales in California would dramatically change in the 1970s. In 1969, Philip Morris (the cigarette company) bought out Miller Brewing Company and in the 70s Miller High Life would soar in sales and popularity along with the introduction of Miller Lite. Also Anheuser Busch in the 70s soared past Coors and Olympia with Budweiser and later Bud Light leading the way. In later decades, what saved Coors was the introduction of its Coors Light. As for Olympia, as of 2021, production of its brand had ceased. For me, Miller High Life is my go-to beer. It has an incredible creamy foam and interestingly I've read on the internet that for craft brewers and bartenders their go-to legacy brand is also Miller High Life.
This is absolutely correct. If they were drinking “cheap” beer, it would have been something like L.A.’s own Brew 102. As lj notes, imported beers weren’t even on the map. And Coca-Cola instead of RC, Shasta or—-God forbid—-Cragmont (Safeway store brand) was living it up.
 

JOv2

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^My dad drank Brew 102 but he told me it was a cheap beer. Busch was his favourite and Budweiser, according to him, was more expensive, so he only drank it on occasion. As for Cragmont -- that's the junk my mom always bought for my birthday parties. YUCK! Carbonated sugar water (which reminds me of an older kid up the street in high school referring to Coors as "carbonate piss water" 😵).

(Actually, it may have been Brew 102 and Shasta...but the photographer switched out the cans. 😁)
 

Rudy

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Coors was a big deal on this side of the country--you had to bring it back from Colorado if you wanted any. But it changed once they got away from using spring water and became a national brand.
 

Harry

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I, too, remember back in the early 70s that Coors beer was somewhat famously unavailable on the east coast - and folks who traveled across to the Denver area would bring cases of it back with them.

In 1978, our new computerized software company was based in Golden, CO, just down the road from the Coors brewery, so everyone took the tour. Somewhere deep in my sock drawer lies a pair of Coors socks!
 

Bobberman

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Coors was a big deal on this side of the country--you had to bring it back from Colorado if you wanted any. But it changed once they got away from using spring water and became a national brand.
I was little in the late 60s early 70s in Southern Idaho I saw Coors signs billboards and products EVERYWHERE and especially those deceptively enjoyable commercials which were seen mostly during Local weather reports during the news I admit I liked the commercials but I hated the smell of the stuff and to this day I never tried Coors beer in any form but I do miss those old commercials filmed in the Colorado high country streams waterfalls and the sedate narration ( just a little history for those who didn't live in the western U.S during that time before they became a national brand) and we kids had jokes about it " Made with Pure Rocky Mountain Panther Wee Wee" ( I changed that last word to keep this clean and family friendly" I imagine they got away from the spring water because at some point it wasn't as clear and clean as it once was I know of a few rivers that were once so clean you could almost see the bottom but more recently I see those same rivers look so clouded you can't see anything through them anymore
 

Michael Hagerty

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I, too, remember back in the early 70s that Coors beer was somewhat famously unavailable on the east coast - and folks who traveled across to the Denver area would bring cases of it back with them.
if I recall, that was the premise of the movie “Smokey and the Bandit”.

Though, truthfully, the only real memory I have of that movie is a young Sally Field in blue jeans.
 

Rudy

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I imagine they got away from the spring water because at some point it wasn't as clear and clean as it once was I know of a few rivers that were once so clean you could almost see the bottom but more recently I see those same rivers look so clouded you can't see anything through them anymore
A few mountain springs I've seen in recent years still look clean, but I think the nationwide mass production kind of eliminated the possibility of using spring water from only one source. It's like many national beers these days--the big breweries bought up the recipes to make the beer, so that Brand A beer is often made alongside the Brand B beer inside the same facility.

It's almost like how Vernor's ginger ale left its hometown and is now a flat-tasting watered down version of the original. And I'm sure Stroh's beer, now brewed by Pabst Breweries, isn't the same as when it left town either.
 

Rudy

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if I recall, that was the premise of the movie “Smokey and the Bandit”.

Though, truthfully, the only real memory I have of that movie is a young Sally Field in blue jeans.
Some drivers still do both an official and unofficial "Bandit Run" to get a case of Coors from Texarkana. The official Bandit Run is more like a scenic road rally, whereas the unofficial (and more "fun" 😉) versions attempt to be the fastest in a round trip to get the beer.
 

Michael Hagerty

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A few mountain springs I've seen in recent years still look clean, but I think the nationwide mass production kind of eliminated the possibility of using spring water from only one source. It's like many national beers these days--the big breweries bought up the recipes to make the beer, so that Brand A beer is often made alongside the Brand B beer inside the same facility.

It's almost like how Vernor's ginger ale left its hometown and is now a flat-tasting watered down version of the original. And I'm sure Stroh's beer, now brewed by Pabst Breweries, isn't the same as when it left town either.
Olympia used to tout its water supply, too---a big "It's the water that makes it Olympia Beer" campaign explaining that it was the artesian spring water in Tumwater, Washington that made it all work. So it really sucked when they got bought in the 80s and the brewery on the river got shut down in the 90s.
 

Michael Hagerty

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Actually, there's probably a whole La Brea Lounge thread about strong regional brands that went to hell, either in terms of quality or market share after they or competitors went national.
 

Harry

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Back to this picture, why do the Coors cans seem to be of different sizes. Today, that's somewhat of a trend to have many different sizes of cans, but back then, wasn't it pretty much all 12 oz. cans?

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lj

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Back in 1969-70 per the photo--Coors in its stubby bottle had strangely enough only 11 ounces. Whereas, the can had 12 ounces. I wasn't aware of a smaller can per the photo. But back then I avoided Coors, as it had practically no taste for me. Rudy referred to Stroh's beer. In the old days it was fired brewed--they boasted the old fashioned European way--in Detroit. For the few times it was offered in Calif. in the early 1980s I tried it and loved the flavor of Stroh's. It is currently unavailable on the west coast. My day-to-day beer is Miller High Life the Champagne of Beers. When I travel I ask for Heineken. Both brews are consistently good. Not too sweet and not to bitter--with a little more emphasis on the barley malt ingredient with a tad more sweetness. When you are thirsty there is no better flavor.
 

Michael Hagerty

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Back in 1969-70 per the photo--Coors in its stubby bottle had strangely enough only 11 ounces. Whereas, the can had 12 ounces. I wasn't aware of a smaller can per the photo. But back then I avoided Coors, as it had practically no taste for me. Rudy referred to Stroh's beer. In the old days it was fired brewed--they boasted the old fashioned European way--in Detroit. For the few times it was offered in Calif. in the early 1980s I tried it and loved the flavor of Stroh's. It is currently unavailable on the west coast. My day-to-day beer is Miller High Life the Champagne of Beers. When I travel I ask for Heineken. Both brews are consistently good. Not too sweet and not to bitter--with a little more emphasis on the barley malt ingredient with a tad more sweetness. When you are thirsty there is no better flavor.
Smaller sizes were common at the time. 12 ounces was considered “large” and 16 was “king size”. 1960s and earlier Coke bottles were 6.5 ounces.
 

Harry

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My memory is somewhat different. I don't think I ever saw a 16 oz beverage can until maybe 2000. Maybe you left coasters were thirstier.

And yes I remember the 6 1/2 oz Coke bottles. Used to collect them as kids and return them for deposit.
 

Michael Hagerty

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My memory is somewhat different. I don't think I ever saw a 16 oz beverage can until maybe 2000. Maybe you left coasters were thirstier.

And yes I remember the 6 1/2 oz Coke bottles. Used to collect them as kids and return them for deposit.
No 16 ounce cans, Harry. Those were bottles.

 

Harry

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Yeah, that soda stuff is well familiar to me. I used to collect Pepsi stuff for a few years as a youngster.

I was referring to the photo. That's a 12 oz Coke can, harlequin design. The Coors can to the left as we view it, is taller, therefore larger than 12 oz. The one to the right is smaller than the Coke can, therefore less than 12 oz.
 
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