The Now Spinning/Recent Purchases Thread

AM Matt

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Listening to The Move "Looking On" (late 1970) (with Roy Wood & joining that group Jeff Lynne)!! The 2nd song "Turkish Blues" was cut from iTunes because I download the album BUT I lost $ 1.29 for that song. That was their best album over the A&M "Shazam"!!
 

Rudy

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Spinning a couple of Astrud Gilberto albums this evening. (OK, the hard drive is spinning...but you know what I mean. 😁) The Astrud Gilberto Album, and A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness.
 

GDB2LV

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I just received the new John Lennon 2CD/blu -ray set “Gimme Some Truth” the music on the remixed discs is excellent. I’m playing the blu-ray now, and it has very interesting playback options. 96-24 PCM Stereo. Surround 96-24 DTS HD-MA 5.1 and 48-24 Dolby Atmos All the music on the 2 CDs is on the blu-ray as well, same order.
The 5.1 is amazing, to say the least. The Dolby Atmos is just fun. 75% of vocals from front speakers and 75% of music from rear speakers. It’s one of the few times the rear center light in my Yamaha RX-V3300 has lit up for complete surround. It was manufactured before Dolby Atmos was invented. Money well spent though. They had a promotion last week similar to Target at Amazon. Buy 2 get 1 free. Anyway I want to ask the technical wizards here, Rudy, what are or do the bit rates mean? Why is Dolby Atmosphere less than the 5.1 or Stereo versions. You can switch the sound during playback without disturbing the track. The Dolby Atmos does play back at a lower volume though. Thanks for any tutorials in advance. Always interesting stuff here. I forgot to mention I’m using my Sony X800M2 4K player for the best sound.
 
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Rudy

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With more channels to reproduce, Dolby Atmos may use a lower sampling rate so they can fit the data on the disc, hence the lower sampling rate. I'm not up on Atmos, so I don't know if there are additional technical limitations. The technical explanation of it all would take a while to figure out and report back here, since there are now so many variations on Dolby and their competitor DTS that involve multichannel audio and different flavors of lossy vs. lossless music reproduction.

Just for clarity, though, when something says "96/24" or similar, they're referring to the sampling rate (96kHz--the data is sampled 96,000 times per second) and bit depth (24 bits per sample, AKA the number of "stairstep" levels in volume/amplitude that can be detected). Bitrate is a calculation: sampling rate x bit depth x number of channels. I remember there was a bitrate limitation on DVD players to where a 24-bit/96kHz/6 channel could be reproduced lossless, but not 24-bit/192kHz/6-channel. (And on top of it, DVD-Audio used MLP--Meridian Lossless Packing, basically a type of data compression--so that the DVD's hardware could keep those surround programs within the bitrate the player hardware could handle.)

Short version--it gets really complicated, really fast. 😁
 

Rudy

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This, out of curiosity (video starts at 3:03)...


...led me to this:


Which made me ask the question, is Herb Alpert a...

 

Rudy

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When I found that first video by the Mavs on YouTube, I was wondering where I'd heard "Swinging Safari" before. It was somewhat familiar. So it's possible I heard Kaempfert's version somewhere, maybe on one of those lounge compilations, or maybe another band covered it. It may not be a coincidence that the Mavs followed it with "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" since that's also on the Kaempfert album as "Wimoweh."

It hasn't ceased to amaze me how far back Raul Malo digs for tunes or inspiration. His parents, especially his mother, listened to a lot of music in the house, and it likely included this Kaempfert record. (I heard when he was a toddler, he used to walk up to the hi-fi and ask his mum, "Do-be-do-be-do?" to hear Sinatra. 😁) En Español follows that same path--it pulls tunes from Cuba, Venezuela, Mexico, France and Italy, among others, and from all decades.
 
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