The Now Spinning/Recent Purchases Thread

Rudy

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¡Hay buena música aquí! It's like a sampler/crash course in Colombian musical styles like cumbia, guaguanco, gaita, merecumbé, descarga, salsa and porro.
 

Mr Bill

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We've talked about this one sporadically in the past, but while looking through hundreds of 12" singles on Discogs, this one came up:


Since this was posted with embedding turned off, you'll have to hop over to YouTube to listen to it.

The backing is an all-star lineup:

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One of my favorite A&M 12-inchers... one of the earlier ones. Badazz did another that i have on 7" 45 (not sure if it ever was a 12") called "Buck$" which sounds as if it came from the same session. Both are "straighter" disco fare, not as funky as Badazz/Armer's RandyAndy album
 

Rudy

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One of my favorite A&M 12-inchers... one of the earlier ones. Badazz did another that i have on 7" 45 (not sure if it ever was a 12") called "Buck$" which sounds as if it came from the same session. Both are "straighter" disco fare, not as funky as Badazz/Armer's RandyAndy album
I can't find anything other than a 7" for "Buck$." In that era labels were just starting to release promo singles on 12" vinyl as opposed to 7" and the tune wasn't long enough (unless it were expanded and remixed) for a 12". That one I can't find on YouTube so I'll probably have to dig up a copy of it on Discogs one of these days.
 

JOv2

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These two complete my Alex North collection. (Some FSM titles can go OOP before you refresh your gimlet and The Shoes of the Fisherman is now too pricey as an OOP, SS; so I found an NM that was somewhat affordable; unfortunately, the double-slim jewel was cracked upon arrival yet, the seller promised to make good with a replacement.)

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Rudy

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I've been playing a couple of the Intrada releases of Henry Mancini's soundtracks this afternoon (a little background for an article I finished up), and decided to finish it off by going way back pre-RCA to Touch of Evil.
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Sound quality isn't so good (I imagine these recordings came from the film studio, similar to the Intrada titles), but on many of the tracks, right way you can tell Mancini penned the tunes. The 20-track CD version I own has a track, "Susan," that others seem to be missing.

The production of the film was an entire story in itself.


 

Harry

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I've been in "Easy Listening Land" today, needledropping the old Paul Mauriat album BLOOMING HITS. This one hit #1 so is in virtually everyone's record collection from that period.

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The full album looks like it's on Youtube in one form or another. There was once a CD from Collectors Choice, now out of print. It's also had two releases on CD in Japan.

 

Rudy

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That's a throwaway record--I had a shipment of vinyl where they used that jacket for package filler. 🤣
 

Bobberman

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I've been in "Easy Listening Land" today, needledropping the old Paul Mauriat album BLOOMING HITS. This one hit #1 so is in virtually everyone's record collection from that period.

View attachment 6592

The full album looks like it's on Youtube in one form or another. There was once a CD from Collectors Choice, now out of print. It's also had two releases on CD in Japan.

I have both of these on CD and some of Mauriat's 80s releases on CD in the form of import releases and some two fer reissues from the Dutton vocation label from England I love Easy listening too Harry my blooming hits CD is the collector's choice version
 

JOv2

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I've been playing a couple of the Intrada releases of Henry Mancini's soundtracks this afternoon (a little background for an article I finished up), and decided to finish it off by going way back pre-RCA to Touch of Evil.
Of late, Intrada has become my favourite s/t label. Interestingly, Touch of Evil is the only Mancini s/t to date that I've yet to get a handle on...it may simply be that it's too early for my ears. (I seem to recall a heapin' helpin' of rock and roll which I don't particularly fancy.)

That's a throwaway record--I had a shipment of vinyl where they used that jacket for package filler.
Imagine the odds, but I also received that jacket as packaging once many years ago! (Pre-1970 non-rock pop LPs are the pacesetter in this realm. In 2nd place is European ethnic music -- you know all those German drinking songs and Irish folk songs LPs of the late '50s / early '60s.)
 

Harry

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With as many copies as that record sold, there would naturally be a ton of really beat-up LPs that aren't good for anything. But their cardboard is still good packing material.

I seem to always get Roger Williams or Ferrante and Teicher as my packing covers.
 

Rudy

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I still remember one record store near me. Two of the employees were saying they'd better get that Whipped Cream record into the bin before Bob (the owner) got ahold of it, because he hauled TJB records straight to the dumpster. 😁
 

Rudy

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Interestingly, Touch of Evil is the only Mancini s/t to date that I've yet to get a handle on...it may simply be that it's too early for my ears. (I seem to recall a heapin' helpin' of rock and roll which I don't particularly fancy.)
I found a lot of it is Latin-based since the plot takes place on the US/Mexico border. And the usual suspense music that Mancini writes. Can't say there's anything that's "real" R&R music since it's Mancini we're talking about, so it's more like a twist or swing with an electric guitar. 😁 The real drawback is that the sound quality is not good. But it can't get any better since that apparently is the only source that exists. I'm really surprised other versions of the CD omit "Susan," which is a mambo straight out of the George Shearing mold (the melody led by that combination of piano, vibraphone and guitar). One of the best tracks on the disc, not to be confused with "Something for Susan."

 

JOv2

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...Well, you do have the Intrada version -- which I'm confident offers content that would surely be an improvement relative to the El release I have (I have to say, by and large I'm not impressed with El CD issues.)

I seem to always get Roger Williams or Ferrante and Teicher as my packing covers.
F&T definitely -- These guys issued more LPs/year then even Conniff's 3-4 LPs/year!
 

Rudy

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...Well, you do have the Intrada version -- which I'm confident offers content that would surely be an improvement relative to the El release I have (I have to say, by and large I'm not impressed with El CD issues.)
Mine is the Varese Sarabande version, from quite a while ago. The other ones I've seen listed in recent years are from labels I've never heard of. The one bonus to an Intrada version is that it should have a booklet with notes about the music.
 

JOv2

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(Ooops. Apologies, Rudy! I've been on an Intrada kick and mis-read your earlier post. I am rather fond of all the film score "bonus" material that is being added to s/t releases -- something I've been actively seeking of late.)
 

Rudy

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This is a fun little album:

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The melodies are in that same playful style that Silver had on his earlier albums. This one features an all-star line-up: Michael Brecker, Claudio Roditi, Ron Carter, Lewis Nash, Ronnie Cuber, and Steve Turre.
 

Rudy

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If you have an hour to spare, here's a Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio gig from the Iowa City Jazz Festival in 2013. I like the Doctor when he's in a trio configuration--he did this with great results when he had the trio with guitarist John Abercrombie and drummer Marvin "Smitty" Smith for the two Hendrix tribute albums along with the Afro-Blue album, all from the 90s. In that lineup, Abercrombie seems like an odd match due to coming from a background that included many albums with ECM Records, which is the polar opposite of the Doctor's energetic groove of soul-jazz on the B3. Yet it worked well because of that difference.

This one features his long-term guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg, with Joe Dyson on drums. Kreisberg's style is also slightly opposed to the Doc's B3, but again, that's what makes it contrast so well and keeps it interesting.

 

AM Matt

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Listening to Dave Grusin "Mountain Dance" (1979 or 1981) which I downloaded on Apple iTunes!! I also downloaded the late Julius Wetcher & The Baja Marimba Band "Fresh Air" (1969). Finally, the late Bill Withers "Menagerie" (1977 which has the song "Lovely Day"), "'Bout Love" (1978), "In The Name Of Love" (with the late Ralph MacDonald) single song (1984) & "Watching You, Watching Me" (1985).
 

Bobberman

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I've been Digging into My Paul Mauriat recordings from the 80s today some of which were reissued by the Dutton Vocalion Label in the UK two standouts are The albums "Magic" from 1982 ( not to be confused with his 1968 lp "Mauriat magic") and his 1983 follow up "Wild Spring" There are some great Covers of hits of the period such as "Even the nights are better" (Air Supply) "Hard to say I'm sorry"( Chicago) " All the Love in the world" ( Dionne warwick") One On One (Hall and oates) just to name a few examples along with some Original instrumental material Mauriat was Quite Generous in his use of Electronic Keyboards alongside his Piano during this period thankfully the few Easy listening stations that remained were still playing his music even though they were imports and very hard to obtain but very well worth it
 

JOv2

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the few Easy listening stations that remained were still playing his music
Although American commercial culture may have turned their collective back on Billy Vaughn, Ray Conniff and others, their music remained quite popular throughout South America, East and Southeast Asia, and parts of Europe. I understand their LPs continued to sell quite well in those parts of the world well beyond the 1970s...
 

Bobberman

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Although American commercial culture may have turned their collective back on Billy Vaughn, Ray Conniff and others, their music remained quite popular throughout South America, East and Southeast Asia, and parts of Europe. I understand their LPs continued to sell quite well in those parts of the world well beyond the 1970s...
True and that explains why we had to special order their albums as they were only available as Imports as our domestic labels and stores wouldn't even bother keeping any in stock
 
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