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Official Review [Album]: "LOVELINES" (SP-3931)

Discussion in 'A Song For You: The Carpenters Forum' started by Chris May, Oct 31, 2013.

HOW WOULD YOU RATE THIS ALBUM?

  1. ***** (BEST)

    9 vote(s)
    17.3%
  2. ****

    27 vote(s)
    51.9%
  3. ***

    8 vote(s)
    15.4%
  4. **

    7 vote(s)
    13.5%
  5. *

    1 vote(s)
    1.9%
  1. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    Richard's comments are being taken slightly out-of-context: He stated that out of the two 1982 tracks on VOTH,only "Now" would have made a follow-up to MIA.

    Richard's comments about his "change of opinion" doesn't really mean anything-as he's contemplating how the situation would've materialized if Karen had lived. The fact is-Richard considers many of the posthumous recordings as some of their finest work,including the Christmas recordings.But,he concedes that if Karen had lived,they would've focused on recording new albums.
     
  2. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    A&M actually considered the idea of a soundtrack for the film-which would've been released in January 1989,and included all the tracks featured in the film. They ultimately decided against the idea-as the release of Lovelines was pending.
     
  3. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    Lovelines was original planned for a late 1987 release. The delay in Richard's solo album release(due to remodeling at A&M studios) and Richard's prolonged involvement in the TV movie postponed the release of Lovelines a few times.

    After Richard's Solo album was finally released,A&M was hoping to have Lovelines out in the Spring of 1988.Richard was busy working on the TV movie-and didn't get Lovelines finished until January 1989.It was postponed a few more times during that year-until it was finally set for a October 31 release.
     
  4. GaryAlan

    GaryAlan Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the information, Mr. J., much of which is 'new' to me, and interesting to learn.
    I appreciate it !

    Although, I do not believe I took anything out of context (as you say " being taken slightly out of context"):
    I have the entire text of Richard Carpenter's statement regarding Voice of The Heart:
    Released after Karen’s tragic, untimely passing on February 4, 1983, “Voice Of The Heart” is a collection of two songs from what turned out to be our last recording sessions, Now and You're Enough (April 1982) and others recorded through the years. At the time of Karen’s passing, the songs that would make up this album needed quite a bit of arranging and production work to bring to completion. This proved difficult at times, but at the time I believed that Karen would have wanted these songs released, and I felt the same. All these years later, I feel differently; the songs are outtakes, and though I still feel that Ordinary Fool is a good vehicle for Karen and a good piece of arranging and production on my part, had Karen lived, we would have turned our attention to the new songs (along with some standards, no doubt)
    and not thought of these tracks again. Out of the two recorded in 1982, only Now would have made any bona fide follow-up to "Made In America".
     
  5. GaryAlan

    GaryAlan Well-Known Member

    Simply for sake of a published reference, regards to song
    Lovelines,
    A Lyric Sheet is included on the Japan SHM-CD (UICY-25304):
    Quoting :

    You're on my Lovelines and that's alright with me
    Just give me good times the way that love should be
    Baby you're the warm glow that helps me through the day
    And darlin' I know I'll always feel this way
    Cause Lovelines never fade

    And later (three times):
    "You're right on my Lovelines and that's alright with me"
     
  6. GaryAlan

    GaryAlan Well-Known Member

    In the December 7th, 1983 Newspaper article the statement is made that Richard had completed nearly 2o tracks.
    ("...considers the ones not on Voice of the Heart as good as the ones on it..." Lewiston Daily Sun)
    Thus, I wonder how far along some of the songs on Lovelines were, prior to its release date in late 1989.
    Certainly many of these songs were in completed form long before filming started on the CBS Movie.
    (That is, even before the late 1987 period referenced by Mr.J. .." planned for a late 1987 release. ")
    So, in lieu of more detailed historical documentation, I maintain my view that had it not been for the
    enormous success of the Television Movie, and immediate following surge in sales, this album was placed on the back burner.
    ( I mean: no true inner sleeve to accompany such a classy piece of Artwork as the outer Sleeve.
    Seems rushed, especially as many of the songs were already 'in-the-can', and the 20th Anniversary had been April, and
    two of the songs were already featured in the Movie.)
    Absolutely love this album, and believe Little Girl Blue and When I Fall In Love to be two of Peter Knights's best.
    (Not-withstanding how much in the minority view I am !).
    Outstanding ballads Your'e The One and Where Do I Go From Here,
    coupled with the Made In America outtakes and the four Solo offerings;
    the only tune which does not resonate with me is Slow Dance.
     
  7. newvillefan

    newvillefan Well-Known Member

    It's funny because that's one of my favourites. I love the pure innocence of it all and I get what Richard meant when he said he thought it was too "young" for them but it's such a pretty song and the background vocals by Karen and Richard are just sublime. I really get lost in the song when I listen to it.
     
  8. GaryAlan

    GaryAlan Well-Known Member

    Stephen, nice commentary;
    I get where you are coming from, in regards, Slow Dance.
    Not that the song is terrible for me, and the vocals are fine, it simply
    fails to ignite a spark under me. I listened to the song late last night,
    couldn't finish it ! It fails to maintain my attention.
    Perhaps the 'innocence of it all' throws me !
    (Not that the McNichol's version didn't scar me for life !).
     
  9. Chris May

    Chris May Resident 'Carpenterologist' Moderator Thread Starter

    Absolutely agree, as this has always been one of my very favorites as well!
     
  10. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    You're entitled to maintain any viewpoint you wish,but I can tell you-I was on the phone with A&M and Joe Gottfried(Richard's then-business manager) on a regular basis during the time period of 1987/1988/1989,getting updates on the inpending release of this album.

    Richard had the final album(which ultimately became Lovelines) planned since 1983-and the track sequencing was chosen in 1987.

    The TV movie had absolutely nothing to do with the release of Lovelines-and.in reality,it was just a distraction that delayed the album's release for two years.
     
  11. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    You just answered your own question.(Question is on line #3/ Answer is on line # 1 & 2)
     
  12. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    The 20th anniversary of the debut album was in November 1989.
     
  13. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    Absolutely agree -and you're not in the minority on that viewpoint. Many people bought Lovelines just for those two standards.
     
  14. GaryAlan

    GaryAlan Well-Known Member

    I certainly appreciate the commentary regarding my post, Mr. J.,
    always interesting to peruse.
    By 20th Anniversary, I thought it was "..of Carpenters signing to A&M Records, April 22,1969--thusly,
    I assumed that the Album should have been ready for release at that juncture, not late November.
    (The Hype sticker on the Album Cover :" Carpenters' 20th Anniversary"..."10 unreleased tracks... and ... from "The Karen Carpenter Story".)
    Of course, if the date of their debut album is used as a beginning, then, I see where the later date would hold.
    Another reason for my (lingering) suspicion has to do with the four solo songs appearing on this album.
    The Lovelines sleeve says:
    Selections 4&7 remixed by Phil Ramone, 1&11 remixed by Richard Carpenter. (These are the four solo songs.)
    I thought those four songs were remixed in 1989, along with Where Do I Go From Here and Little Girl Blue. (ref: From The Top Notes).

    Thus, you are providing some interesting news, in that, Richard had the final album "planned since 1983" ,
    therefore, his intent would appear to be that those solo songs were being thought of for release as far back as 1983.
    That does not make any sense to me.( Pardon my quizzical atttitude-- I thought he 'hated' those songs.)
    In the early days, an album was completed in three months,why then wasn't the album ready to release earlier ?
    What was the hold-up? I suppose the answer--working on the TV Movie--does not hold much weight with me.
    And, of course, I could be totally wrong.
     
  15. mr J.

    mr J. Active Member

    It wasn't until around 1987 that Richard decided to use some of the solo tracks-due to the thousands of requests that he(and A&M) received concerning the solo album.

    The album was ready for release in January 1989-but the decision was made for a September release.When September rolled around,the release was pushed back to October 31.
     
    GaryAlan likes this.
  16. newvillefan

    newvillefan Well-Known Member

    The most interesting story for me surrounding this album is that 'My Body Keeps Changing My Mind' was nearly chosen over 'Remember When Lovin' Took All Night'. I think Richard made the right choice in the end...
     
  17. newvillefan

    newvillefan Well-Known Member

    There was an article (was it from the Carpenters camp itself?) written in the late 80s that mentioned this. I know because it was posted on this forum. Maybe someone can remember where...was it this thread?!
     
  18. Rumbahbah

    Rumbahbah Active Member

    The info about 'My Body Keeps Changing My Mind' being initially considered for inclusion on Lovelines comes from a seemingly official relaunch of the fan club newsletter from 1990, which is on page 20 of the Karen Carpenter thread. Just read it again and it's a surprisingly frank and detailed discussion about the solo album, particularly for 1990 when details on the solo album were few and far between.
     
  19. newvillefan

    newvillefan Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the reminder...here's the link again.

    Fan Club Newsletter: June 1990 - Only Yesterday (.pdf)
     
  20. Rick-An Ordinary Fool

    Rick-An Ordinary Fool Well-Known Member

    FL
    Stephen you have a "sharp mind" with everything Carpenters!!! That was good information.
     
  21. GaryAlan

    GaryAlan Well-Known Member

    Lovelines released October 1989, thus, for some background of events unfolding in 1989:
    'For Sale' Signs at A&M Records?
    July 09, 1989|PAUL GREIN
    It's the hottest rumor in the music industry: A&M Records, the label that brought you Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, the Carpenters, Peter Frampton, the Police and Janet Jackson, is supposedly for sale.
    The reported asking price: $500 million--not including A&M's extensive real estate holdings in Hollywood or its Almo/Irving music publishing division.
    The rumor mill has even produced a potential buyer: Fujisankei, the Japanese communications conglomerate that releases A&M product in Japan through its Pony Canyon subsidiary.
    Industry scuttlebutt notwithstanding, A&M chairman Jerry Moss insists that the label isn't for sale--at least not now.
    "The company is not imminently for sale, and I'm convinced all these rumors are just spread by our competition," he told Pop Eye. "They constantly put our people on edge, confuse our artists and affect my negotiations. It's terrible. They're unfounded."
    Moss acknowledged that his use of words like "imminently" and "for the time being" makes his denial seem qualified, but he said, "I can only speak for now."
    Moss did say, however, that in a general, philosophical way, he and his partner Herb Alpert have begun to see the day when they'd like to step down from the company that they founded in 1962.
    "But I think if that time came it would be under the best circumstances for our people, where they would have an opportunity to perform at a higher level in every way with our artists," Moss said. "If that kind of a situation came about, an offer that was so unbelievable, obviously (we'd have to consider it).
    "But I think the way the company is set up at the present time gives me the latitude to do the kind of things I like to do. I'm not in a big hurry to change it. I'm still having a good time."
    A&M's poor showing on the national sales charts this year has helped fuel the speculation about a sale. The label has just two albums in Billboard magazine's top 100 this week--LPs by the Neville Brothers and soap opera star Michael Damian (the latter through a distribution deal with Cypress Records). At one point in April, A&M had just one album in the top 100, a woeful performance for a major company.
    Like all record companies, A&M has had lean years before--most recently in 1984--and it has always bounced back. In 1985 and 1986, for example, A&M rebounded with smash albums by Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams and Sting. A&M could bounce back again: Jackson's final album under her current A&M contract, "Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation," is due this fall, along with albums by Adams, Suzanne Vega, Brenda Russell and Squeeze.
    The rumors about A&M come just two months after Thorne-EMI acquired a 50% interest in Chrysalis Records, and amid much speculation about an imminent sale of Island Records.
    "You're seeing an incredible shrinking of the record business," said David Geffen, whose Geffen Records has in the past two years surpassed A&M as the industry's most successful independently owned record company.
    The reason for the buying spree, Geffen said, is that the major record distributors need volume to make the system work.
    "Volume is everything for RCA, PolyGram, MCA and Capitol, and they can't seem to get it any other way than acquiring these other companies," he said. "It seems to me that by the end of next year, the only independently owned record company of any size left will be mine because I have no intentions of selling."
    One reason for the A&M rumors is that Alpert and Moss declined to comment on them for several weeks. Moss acknowledged that the silence probably fueled the flames.

    Source:
    http://articles.latimes.com/1989-07-09/entertainment/ca-5116_1_island-records
     
  22. Charlie D

    Charlie D Active Member

    Did Richard make any changes to "If We Try"? It sounds warmer and clearer but I don't know if that's just me hearing it.
     
  23. Charlie D

    Charlie D Active Member

    Oh, I always thought that it was the solo mix that charted in 1996. I know he already did his remix but it was released as a "Karen Carpenter" song so I assumed they put out the Ramone mix.
     
  24. newvillefan

    newvillefan Well-Known Member

    My ears have never heard any difference between the original Ramone mixes of 'If We Try', 'Remember When Lovin' Took All Night' or 'Still Crazy After All These Years'. Some have mentioned extra reverb but honestly the difference is inaudible to me.
     
  25. Charlie D

    Charlie D Active Member

    Okay, so then it's probably just me haha. I guess I assumed so because there's much warmth and atmosphere to "If We Try" that I feel is missing from most of the album, that I thought it was different from Phil's mix. Like, I love what Richard did with "My Body..." he gave it that warmth and ambiance that the original one lacked.
     
    byline likes this.

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