The Now Spinning/Recent Purchases Thread

Bobberman

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On a positive note I finally tracked down a like new condition CD of Classical Guitarist Christopher parkening's 1972 album "Parkening plays Bach the CD version has added bonus tracks like many albums I wore the vinyl out and I couldn't find it on CD until now and I immediately ripped it into my computer and I'm waiting for delivery on Andres Segovia's more rare album Recital intimo( an import reissue of a 1975 recording originally released by RCA titled "The intimate Guitar") which I also had on vinyl and wore out I always enjoy some classical guitar especially in times like now
 

Rudy

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Those sound good--I did see a CD called A Bach Celebration on Qobuz but I would guess it is probably a different recording. There are 13 of his albums listed, as opposed to over 100 by Andres Segovia (most of which look like re-compilations). I may need to tap into these soon. :wink:

I've mainly been in a Debussy or Bartok mode in terms of classical music lately, as I've mentioned before. I see that my favorite version of Nocturnes is posted on YouTube. It is in three movements, but the first is perhaps my favorite of the three. "Nuages" ("clouds") is one of those works that floats along effortlessly--it is aptly titled. "Fetes" (roughly "festivities", as in holiday/celebration) is light and lively. "Sirenes" ("mermaids") is otherworldly. It's like these Nocturnes cover sky, land and sea. Bernard Haitink's treatment of this work (with the Concertgebouw Orchestra) is by far my favorite--he has just the right touch for it, and I understand he is quite fond of Debussy's works.


For Bartok, my go-to version of Concerto for Orchestra was recorded by Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra...back in 1955, in stereo. Significant because there were no stereo LPs at the time, so the stereo version of this record (LSC-1934) was not released by RCA until 1958. RCA released it in stereo on a 2-track reel (which I would assume is a collector's item now--the only sale on Discogs was $140), and on monaural LP (LM-1934) in 1956. 1958 was also the recording date of a second Bartok album by Reiner, Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta. Both are in this video (they were combined onto a single SACD):


You would not think, from the sound, that Concerto for Orchestra was recorded 65 (!) years ago!

The second movement of the Concerto for Orchestra (at the 10:00 mark) is my favorite. Bartok composed a concerto for the entire orchestra (as opposed to a single instrument) as he wanted to provide a vehicle to highlight individual instruments or sections of an orchestra. The second movement is the most clever. Pairs of instruments are featured, each pair using a different interval on the musical scale. The opening bassoons are a minor sixth apart. Oboes play their section a minor third apart. Flutes play theirs a fifth apart. And so on.

For the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (the second of three works on this SACD, beginning at 37:20), my favorite movement (starting just after the 44:00 mark) reminds me of a Warner Brothers cartoon. 😁 (I could have imagined Chuck Jones and team concocting some sort of "Wabbit Season" episode from this one.)
 

Bobberman

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Another classical album I like is surprisingly by Mannheim steamroller keyboardist Jackson Berkey an album called "Ballade" recorded in the early 80s I downloaded the album sometime back and the title track is Debussy's Ballade and I loved it he did one earlier called " Sunken catherdral" which remains out of print although I have a song or two from it on sampler cd comps Jackson Berkey was a classically trained pianist and his solo albums are primarily classical piano and in my opinion well worth a listen.
 

Rudy

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"Sunken Cathedral" (or perhaps "Engulfed Cathedral") is one of Debussy's works---I forget which "book" it was from. Back in the 90s I bought a set of four CDs that contain all of Debussy's solo piano works.

I get that Debussy admiration from the Tomita Snowflakes Are Dancing album that I had back in the 70s. I think the first track on Side Two was that same tune, actually.
 

Harry

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Giving another spin today of the JACK DAUGHERTY AND THE CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-ONE album.

 

Rudy

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A new one spinning lately--another great James Hunter Six album.

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I preordered from Daptone and got the limited edition splatter vinyl pressing:

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Rudy

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Writing up a draft of an article today, and found myself listening to everything from Jools Holland, The Mavericks and Devo to Joe Jackson, the Cramps and Matt Bianco.
 

GDB2LV

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Love Matt Bianco! I believe I own their entire output on cd. Devo is great fun as well.
Glad they are still performing in concert. Big 80’s show in Los Angeles in early May if it doesn’t get cancelled. With Blondie, Morrissey, and a dozen other 80’s acts.
 

Rudy

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The Matt Bianco records are a lot of fun! It's a shame they never had chart success over here in the US.

Devo has always been interesting in a quirky sort of way. 😁

I'm following a theme based on these groups, which is why I lumped them all together for this article. All told, my list includes Naked Eyes, Isaac Hayes, Oingo Boingo, Matt Bianco, Jools Holland, Herb & The TJB, The Mavericks, BR5-49, Devo, Pseudo Echo and The Cramps. The best-known hits of two of the 80s bands might clue you into the theme of the article... 😉
 

DeeInKY

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Just ordered The Mavericks latest CD. Got a free download with it. Man, Raul sounds great! Can’t believe I wasn’t listening to them until here recently!
 

Rudy

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Just ordered The Mavericks latest CD. Got a free download with it. Man, Raul sounds great! Can’t believe I wasn’t listening to them until here recently!
I only just discovered them myself a couple of years ago. I'm sorry I missed out on so many of their great recordings. I wouldn't say they have a cult following, but aside from their early successes and breakthrough on the country charts, they've kind of steered away from massive popularity. I think part of it was due to the group's (and especially Raul's) inclusion of so many other outside influences, that country listeners had no idea what to make of the group. I bought their Christmas LP only because I needed something different...and look what it turned into. 😁
 

DeeInKY

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I’d love to see them live. If the stupid virus ever goes away.

I’m in one of those high risk categories, but today I threw caution to the wind and hit the Arby’s drive through for a fish sandwich.
 

Rudy

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I’d love to see them live. If the stupid virus ever goes away.
They have been rescheduling their tour dates, so it's possible something near you might come available later in the year. I've been wanting to see them also. Raul also goes out on solo tours, just him and his guitar, where he plays and sings, and tells stories in between. He was in the middle of a solo tour when the virus hit, and he's been home ever since. (He's keeping us entertained with "Quarantunes" where he plays along to some backing music and plays a Mellotron.)

There are a lot of concerts on YouTube in the meantime. And their setlist changes each day. One interesting set opener was the Frankie Yankovic polka "Roll Out The Barrel," done as an instrumental featuring Michael Guerra (accordion...tell me, what other band tours with an accordion player? :laugh: ), and the audience usually sings the chorus. The song segues into "Rolling Along" from their 2018 album Brand New Day. Some of the concerts are taken by the audience, where others are more official.

The accordion has an interesting history--European settlers from Germany, Poland and Czechoslovakia brought them to Mexico and Texas, and those who were in Mexico fled to central and south Texas during the Mexican Revolution. The resulting mash-up of their European musical styles (including polkas and waltzes) and Mexican/Texan music is what created Tejano music, which is one of the prominent styles Raul and company identify with. Raul's parents emigrated from Cuba in the early 60s, so he brings that along as well. His mother was into operatic singing, so that is where he gets his vocal style from. (You really hear this on the slow tunes on Play The Hits.) He has said one of the defining songs in his life was "It's Now Or Never" by Elvis, as it incorporated his rock and roll interests with the operatic (the tune is based on "O Sole Mio").

This goes way back! (To the early 90s, and Nashville.)

 

AM Matt

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Pete Pardo forgot about Chuck Mangione's "Land Of Make Believe", the Chet Atkins of jazz, Howard Roberts "Antelope Freeway" (Impulse!/ABC) (1971) including when he switches on the AM radio to hear what song is playing!! Also George Benson "Weekend In L.A." (1978) a great live album!!
 

Harry

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Now spinning, for the purpose of clean-up, is Lani Hall's ALBANY PARK (SP-4898) from 1982. This was the last of her English-language albums for A&M. I had done a needledrop ages ago but there was some sloppy indexing due to the type of CD-recorder I was using then. This is one of those projects I've been meaning to finish for a long time, but now seem to have an abundance of time. My version of the CD includes her b-side, "Love Makes The World."

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Rudy

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Those leg warmers though... :biglaugh:

Been working 12+ hour days, and the only thing getting me through is a stack of classical tracks in the queue. Right now it's all four Rachmaninoff piano concertos, Vladimir Ashkenazy on piano, with Bernard Haitink conducting. I'll put on some Oregon next. Going to be another long couple of days!
 

DAN BOLTON

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Now spinning, for the purpose of clean-up, is Lani Hall's ALBANY PARK (SP-4898) from 1982. This was the last of her English-language albums for A&M. I had done a needledrop ages ago but there was some sloppy indexing due to the type of CD-recorder I was using then. This is one of those projects I've been meaning to finish for a long time, but now seem to have an abundance of time. My version of the CD includes her b-side, "Love Makes The World."

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Always did like that cover...
 

Bobberman

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Now spinning, for the purpose of clean-up, is Lani Hall's ALBANY PARK (SP-4898) from 1982. This was the last of her English-language albums for A&M. I had done a needledrop ages ago but there was some sloppy indexing due to the type of CD-recorder I was using then. This is one of those projects I've been meaning to finish for a long time, but now seem to have an abundance of time. My version of the CD includes her b-side, "Love Makes The World."

View attachment 5414
I still have my needle drop copy and it has withstood the test of time and I still love it
 

AM Matt

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Just downloaded on itunes, Sanford/Townsend Band "Nail Me To The Wall" (their 3rd & final album from 1979) which sounds like The Doobie Brothers meets southern rockers Wet Willie!! I was about to download Cock Robin (of "When Your Heart Is Weak") debut from 1985 as well as "After Here Through Midland" (1987) & their 3rd one from 1990 BUT itunes do NOT have those except their last studio album from 2010. The original female singer is no longer with the group.
 

Rudy

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Got Blue Maqams by Anouar Brahem playing at the moment. Calming, as I try to work on a major upgrade project.

 

Rudy

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Here is something somewhat rare.


Sounds nothing like the Perez Prado you know from the days of mambo?

The Perez Prado that was a sensation in the US was Damaso Perez Prado. In South American families, the children took on the surnames of the mother and father. So this would be like "Thomas Smith Johnson" as a person's name, and touring under the name Smith Johnson.

Damaso had a brother, Pantaleone, who was also a musician. At one point (according to the liner notes in a compilation I have), Pantaleone was out touring when Damaso was popular, and causing confusion. Damaso sued his brother over using the name without informing audiences that this wasn't Damaso, but Pantaleone. Pantaleone settled in Italy and released a number of recordings released in Europe, still under the name Perez Prado, up until his death in the early 80s. This video above is one of them.
 

Rudy

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An interesting album this evening. Dis, by Jan Garbarek with Ralph Towner and a wind harp (recorded out on the sea cliffs). A very introspective album.

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