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Official Review [Album]: "NOW & THEN" (SP-3519)

HOW WOULD YOU RATE THIS ALBUM?

  • ***** (BEST)

    Votes: 13 18.3%
  • ****

    Votes: 40 56.3%
  • ***

    Votes: 17 23.9%
  • **

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • *

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    71

Carpe diem

Well-Known Member
^^Agreed, on all three points you brought up. Especially, that piano interlude cannot be overstated, it literally "makes" the song. Pop music genius!
 

newvillefan

I Know My First Name Is Stephen
I think George Benson's version of 'This Masquerade' is very nice, but the Carpenters' version is just on another level and it was there for them to claim as the definitive take if they'd have chosen to release it as a single.
Not releasing it as a single is one of the bigger mistakes they made in my humble opinion. I know it’s longer than usual for a single at that time but it’s so classy that I think the gamble would have paid off and rewarded them with a hit. It’s there on many hits compilations today, masquerading (parson the pun) as a single and I’m sure many casual fans simply assume it was originally.
 

CraigGA

Well-Known Member
Not releasing it as a single is one of the bigger mistakes they made in my humble opinion. I know it’s longer than usual for a single at that time but it’s so classy that I think the gamble would have paid off and rewarded them with a hit. It’s there on many hits compilations today, masquerading (parson the pun) as a single and I’m sure many casual fans simply assume it was originally.
Being the flip side of Please Mr. Postmsn was certainly a favor to Leon Russell, probably more so than if it was a hit on its own since Please Mr Postman as No 1 worldwide went to his financial advantage. Could there have been thoughts of a double sided hit?
 

tomswift2002

Well-Known Member
Not releasing it as a single is one of the bigger mistakes they made in my humble opinion. I know it’s longer than usual for a single at that time but it’s so classy that I think the gamble would have paid off and rewarded them with a hit. It’s there on many hits compilations today, masquerading (parson the pun) as a single and I’m sure many casual fans simply assume it was originally.
It’s been on hits compilations since the 1970’s. It appeared on the Canadian “Carpenters Collection” LP set and the “Carpenters ‘woodgrain’ Classics” LP in 1978.
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
10 Essential Reggae Covers of Country Classics
With International Reggae Day turning 25, we look at great reggae covers of country tunes by Toots & the Maytals, Max Romeo, and more
10 Essential Reggae Covers of Country Classics

“Jambalaya,” Pluto Shervington

Cajun country-meets-Jamaican reggae and calypso in this slickly produced rendition of one of Hank Williams’ best-loved tunes.
From Shervington’s 1974 LP, Ramgoat Liver, this owes more than a little inspiration to the Carpenters’ country-pop version at the time,
but it’s still vibrant and fun.
 
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