• Two exciting new Carpenters releases are now available. The new book Carpenters: The Musical Legacy can be ordered here. A big thanks to the authors and Richard Carpenter for their tremendous effort in compiling this book! Also, the new solo piano album Richard Carpenter's Piano Songbook is available for ordering here.

🎤 Interview Richard Carpenter Interview 2014

song4u

Well-Known Member
The situation with "Goodbye To Love" has been prevalent since it's release in 1972-people didn't like that guitar solo then,and they still don't like it today.

KC and rock aren't a good mix-and as good as that guitar solo is,it doesn't belong on a Carpenters recording.But,it would've sounded fantastic on a Jimi Hendrix record.
Couldn't agree less. Sorry. :crazy:

Do Anton Drennin's guitar solos with The Corrs remind anyone else of the awesome Tony Peluso?
 

GaryAlan

Well-Known Member
A rather cursory search of references/citations to Carpenters' Goodbye To Love, will show that it is highly acclaimed.
Especially more so today:
"The earliest known documented recording of the Big Muff Pi was by guitarist Tony Peluso, who recorded the solos for The Carpenters hit Goodbye to Love in 1972 with a V1 "Triangle" Big Muff, using a Gibson ES-335 recorded directly into the recording board with no amplifier. A very rocking solo for the time, and very heavy for the Carpenters, the use of the Big Muff in this song paved the way for the rock and roll power ballad.
I wrote most of this melody while visiting London in 1971...While constructing the arrangement, I pictured a melodic fuzz guitar solo, and knew just the guitarist I wanted to employ—Tony Peluso. Karen and I had met Tony in 1971 when his band, Instant Joy, had backed Mark Lindsay, who had opened for us on our spring tour. The resulting guitar solo is, in my opinion, one of the best in recording history. “Goodbye To Love” went Top 10, but did provoke some “hate mail” from people who claimed we had sold out, and gone HARD ROCK!!! - Richard Carpenter from his website
Armed with a '58 Gibson ES-335, a custom Red Rhodes-designed compressor, and an Electro-Harmonix Big Muff fuzz, Peluso walked into a session that featured such studio heavyweights as guitarist Louie Shelton and drummer Hal Blaine. Peluso plugged his guitar into the compressor and the Big Muff, and then ran direct into a custom Haeco mixing console. All tracks were recorded on a Scully 2" 16-track analog tape machine. According to Peluso, "Richard told me to quote the melody and then solo. I was really laying back because I didn't want to get in the way of all those beautiful tracks. But Richard stopped the tape and said, "No, no, no-we want you to PLAY!' He rolled the tape again, and that second take is what you hear on the record". He also states that he used a Fender medium pick that he had cut serrations into, which is heard on the solo, and that he tuned his guitar FFCFAC for the solo. He says it is the only tuning he has ever used. Peluso goes on to say that Richard Carpenter mixed the guitar solo very loud, very bold for a Carpenters tune." - From "Classic Riffs" Guitar Player, August 2001
 

GDBY2LV

Well-Known Member
Thank you defenders of this classic tune. I was one of those that didn't like it when I listened to the A Song For You album for the first time in the late spring of 1972. It was an almost knock the wind out of you reaction, and certainly did not expect to hear that guitar solo. The song of course was released as a single and it grew on me. Being a choral singer through most of my life in school, the muti layered ahs in the end won me over. It became, and still is my favorite song of all time. Simply amazing and brilliant on Richard's part.
 

Mike Blakesley

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
The situation with "Goodbye To Love" has been prevalent since it's release in 1972-people didn't like that guitar solo then,and they still don't like it today.
KC and rock aren't a good mix-and as good as that guitar solo is,it doesn't belong on a Carpenters recording.

I also can't disagree more on this. "Pushing the envelope" was what made the A Song For You album the great record that it is. If "Goodbye to Love" had been done without the guitar solo, it would have been just another Carpenters ballad but it would lose that special-ness. It's the solo that lifts it up into greatness.

They had a certain amount of other "jarring" moments -- like "Another Song" or "Intermission" or offbeat things like "Piano Picker," or the rock'n'roll oldies medley, or "Calling Occupants," and etc. plus their whole sound was pretty unusual for its era....so I don't really know how you could make a list of what "belonged" in a Carpenters record and what didn't.

A few fans not liking it shouldn't really enter into the equation. It was a huge hit record so apparently somebody liked it!
 

Guitarmutt

Well-Known Member
I also can't disagree more on this. "Pushing the envelope" was what made the A Song For You album the great record that it is. If "Goodbye to Love" had been done without the guitar solo, it would have been just another Carpenters ballad but it would lose that special-ness. It's the solo that lifts it up into greatness.

They had a certain amount of other "jarring" moments -- like "Another Song" or "Intermission" or offbeat things like "Piano Picker," or the rock'n'roll oldies medley, or "Calling Occupants," and etc. plus their whole sound was pretty unusual for its era....so I don't really know how you could make a list of what "belonged" in a Carpenters record and what didn't.

A few fans not liking it shouldn't really enter into the equation. It was a huge hit record so apparently somebody liked it!
This is so true! If you take in the entire spectrum of sounds K & R released, there are tons and tons of things to surprise and delight the listener. That's what keeps it fresh, and that's why so many of us found this forum!!!
 

BarryT60

Well-Known Member
I have scanned this lengthy thread and apologize if I missed the question... Which version of Rainy Days concludes this interview? Different vocals, and certainly a different ending arrangement... I don't think I have heard it before... Thanks all!
 

newvillefan

I Know My First Name Is Stephen
I have scanned this lengthy thread and apologize if I missed the question... Which version of Rainy Days concludes this interview? Different vocals, and certainly a different ending arrangement... I don't think I have heard it before... Thanks all!

That was released on the 'As Time Goes By' album. It was originally performed in their First Television Special and years later resweetened with new orchestra parts for inclusion on the album.
 

ScottyB

Well-Known Member
While I did enjoy the RC interview, I was disappointed to hear him say that everything is out there. I find that hard to believe. I have always heard that there was more, especially vaulted songs recorded during the Made in America. However, I have decided to keep the legacy alive by re-inventing the way I listen to their songs. Even though I love all the albums in their original formats, I have created my own compilations with varying themes. For instance, the first one I made was My Personal Favorites, a collection of 20 of my favorite Carpenters songs (a very difficult selection choice, indeed). Plus I put together a disc I call Make Your Own Kind Of Music, a collection of the songs they performed on their television series of the same name. And to make this collection more unique, I sequenced the songs in alphabetical order just like the format used in the series. To fill the gap on the CD, I included additional songs from Ticket To Ride, which I felt wasn't represented enough in the series. I love this collection because it represents my favorite period of their career. Other personal compilations are in the works, such as The Made In America Sessions, country songs (or those that have a country feel), oldies...et. al
 

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
I have made a Bacharach collection, a Paul Williams one, songs written by Carpenter/Bettis, etc.
Yes, its is a fun way to listen in a fresh presentation!
 

Chris May

Resident ‘Carpenterologist’
Staff member
Moderator
Thread Starter
While I did enjoy the RC interview, I was disappointed to hear him say that everything is out there. I find that hard to believe. I have always heard that there was more, especially vaulted songs recorded during the Made in America. However, I have decided to keep the legacy alive by re-inventing the way I listen to their songs. Even though I love all the albums in their original formats, I have created my own compilations with varying themes. For instance, the first one I made was My Personal Favorites, a collection of 20 of my favorite Carpenters songs (a very difficult selection choice, indeed). Plus I put together a disc I call Make Your Own Kind Of Music, a collection of the songs they performed on their television series of the same name. And to make this collection more unique, I sequenced the songs in alphabetical order just like the format used in the series. To fill the gap on the CD, I included additional songs from Ticket To Ride, which I felt wasn't represented enough in the series. I love this collection because it represents my favorite period of their career. Other personal compilations are in the works, such as The Made In America Sessions, country songs (or those that have a country feel), oldies...et. al

Well do remember that more than one song or recording would fit on a 2" reel of master analog tape. The fire that happened at Universal was very real, and a majority of the Carpenters' catalog on the original 2" 16-track and 24-track master tapes were in fact destroyed, which means if an "outtake" was recorded on the same master reel as say "A Song For You", then guess what? The outtake is no longer in existence most likely if that reel of taped was destroyed.

David Alley is a friend of mine (he managed Karen and Richard off and on for years and even dated Karen) and we've recently had some very detailed conversation about this stuff. When he was managing Richard during several of the "compilation remix album" periods (take any number of them out there between 1985-2000), he would request that when the *original* 2" analog multitrack tapes were delivered to the studio for remixing projects, he would often instruct the studio engineers to transfer many of the masters over to ProTools - basically at that time so to insure that if tapes eventually were destroyed simply due to age and oxidation as it is more commonly termed, they would have a clean, hi-quality digital transfer of the multi-tracks to go back to. In fact, all of the As Time Goes By album (as you may have picked up on watching some of the clips I provided) was mixed from 1/4" digital 48-track tapes that were all TRANSFERS from the original masters. None of that album was mixed (to my knowledge) from the original tapes - and the stuff sounded fantastic.

David does not have any recollection as to which reels of tape, nor which songs etc were transferred, and Universal did not mandate this as a standard of practice at the time. SO, there probably are some things still left out there that could be remixed from the digital multi-track stems, but again, only Richard knows what he's got to work with and or whether or not it's worth it to release.

Guys, Richard's done. I know it's a hard pill for people to swallow, but this is the reason I go to lengths to stay connected, give updates, do some of the radio interviews I did and even provide some extremely rare video footage from the studio - SO that we can continue to keep that flame alive. I can tell you that there is still media out there, information and people who were perhaps NOT interviewed for the Little Girl Blue book by Randy Schmidt that can still offer additional insight and some new material along the way. This stuff won't surface as quickly as it did when Richard was working with Universal to put out a Japanese import or comp album once or twice a year, but I don't think we've seen the last of everything there is to see - whether it be pictures, footage, outtakes, and deeper and more insightful interviews.

To quote one of my all-time favorite character actors Carroll O'Connor (aka "Archie Bunker"), "Patience is a virgin."
 
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Rick-An Ordinary Fool

Well-Known Member
Chris, I was thinking should the title of this thread read Richard Carpenter Final Public Interview 2014?

We know he is done with the musical aspect of the recordings but wasn't this the final interview he will ever give or is he still giving interviews?
 

Chris May

Resident ‘Carpenterologist’
Staff member
Moderator
Thread Starter
Chris, I was thinking should the title of this thread read Richard Carpenter Final Public Interview 2014?

We know he is done with the musical aspect of the recordings but wasn't this the final interview he will ever give or is he still giving interviews?
Honestly I can't personally answer that. I was told at the time we did the interview that it came as quite a surprise to those within his personal circle that he'd agreed to do the interview, simply because he apparently hadn't done one in a few years and had turned down more requests that could be counted (just quoting what I was told).

With that said, I can't say Richard will NEVER do another interview, but from the inside information I still am able to gather from time to time, he's really not interested in investing much more of his time to Carpenters. If our interview *did* end up being his last, I would feel beyond fortunate to have been the one to have secured it. Personally I can't imagine he won't EVER do another - but again, we just don't know. :sigh:
 

Mark-T

Well-Known Member
Chris- what about his project with the Nashville singer? Will we see that released? I love his production projects with Scott, Akiko and Veronique.
 

Rick-An Ordinary Fool

Well-Known Member
I haven't re-listened to the interview but from what I remember the ending seemed so final that is why I asked that question it seemed like it was the last time he was willing to be interviewed...at least that is how I took it. When you asked him "How did you want to be remembered?" or something on that line....it made me think that this was the last interview he was willing to give....I could be wrong and my guess is that he likes being interviewed by you Chris and my bet would be that you could secure one more if not additional ones in the near future...with the emphasis on "near" :wink:
 

WYBIMLA

Well-Known Member
Well if that's the case, Chris, if you get a second chance to interview Richard I'd put it out to you that I would like to hear a bit more about his thoughts and feelings about some of his later work. That is... if he wants to talk about it.
Of course, I'd love to hear a lot more about work with Karen! I'd would also like to hear more about things we don't have much info on too (Smokey, Veronique, Akiko, and his solo albums). Just to give a fuller picture.

It's all so long ago now though... maybe he isn't too connected with any of it these days.

We already have lots of reference material thanks to people uploading interviews he's done. The documentaries that have been put out have a lot to say about the work gone into the earlier stuff. I feel like I've heard those stories again and again. It's during the 80s and onward that's missing some stories.

Maybe there's not much left to say.

All he can do now is clarify a few things, and provide his up-to-date feelings towards his life's work since he's not promoting anything.

I can't imagine living your life having to return to discuss the glory years and achievements of your 20s every so often.
And then thinking about going on without his sister, friend, and business partner. I've heard him say it's been a real "thorn in his side" all these years.
I can understand why he would be reluctant to give interviews. Re-living something like that must be awfully painful to talk about... or rather very bitter-sweet. Interviewing isn't always a nice thing to have to do, but Richard does handle them quite well.

If he does another one in the future I'd love to hear it though!

One more promotion... one more spot in a documentary... one more time...

It would be nice.
 

Chris May

Resident ‘Carpenterologist’
Staff member
Moderator
Thread Starter
Well if that's the case, Chris, if you get a second chance to interview Richard I'd put it out to you that I would like to hear a bit more about his thoughts and feelings about some of his later work. That is... if he wants to talk about it.
Of course, I'd love to hear a lot more about work with Karen! I'd would also like to hear more about things we don't have much info on too (Smokey, Veronique, Akiko, and his solo albums). Just to give a fuller picture.

It's all so long ago now though... maybe he isn't too connected with any of it these days.

We already have lots of reference material thanks to people uploading interviews he's done. The documentaries that have been put out have a lot to say about the work gone into the earlier stuff. I feel like I've heard those stories again and again. It's during the 80s and onward that's missing some stories.

Maybe there's not much left to say.

All he can do now is clarify a few things, and provide his up-to-date feelings towards his life's work since he's not promoting anything.

I can't imagine living your life having to return to discuss the glory years and achievements of your 20s every so often.
And then thinking about going on without his sister, friend, and business partner. I've heard him say it's been a real "thorn in his side" all these years.
I can understand why he would be reluctant to give interviews. Re-living something like that must be awfully painful to talk about... or rather very bitter-sweet. Interviewing isn't always a nice thing to have to do, but Richard does handle them quite well.

If he does another one in the future I'd love to hear it though!

One more promotion... one more spot in a documentary... one more time...

It would be nice.

Well, and it's been said before (heck, I think I've even said it) - CARPENTERS are what and who WE know - "we", meaning the fans know them to be. But they are just people like you, me, and the rest of society. BELIEVE me, even with the verified information that is floating around out there in books, documentaries, articles, etc..., there is SO much more to who Karen really was and who Richard still is to this day, that if revealed - in other words, if each fan could be a "fly on the wall" so to speak, would be shocked at the differences between what "WE" have believed Karen and Richard to be, versus who they really were/are. I know this for a fact with Richard, because I've witnessed a whole different person in real life on several occasions. I've been told this from close friends about Karen as well.

So to sum it all up, absolutely none of this shocks me about Richard. He's done and he deserves to be IMHO. :sigh:
 
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